National Implementation Plan (NIP) for the Stockholm Convention on POPs 2021-07-06

Built Environment pops persistent organic pollutants stockholm convention hazardous waste upops national action plan

Although Tuvalu has no history of manufacturing persistent organic pollutants (POPs), this data-set consists of; 1. the first report (2008) that represents the first stepping stone for the country to outline strategies in order to meet its obligations under the Stockholm Convention, also given the chemical nature, including long range environmental transport of POPs that is a global concern. 2. The Tuvalu National Action Plan to reduce releases of unintentional persistent organic pollutants (u-POPs) 2018 - 2022

Vaitupu 2019 Tide Predictions Calendar 2021-07-06

Atmosphere and Climate Coastal and Marine tide tide calender vaitupu

The Annual Tide Predictions Calendars are a popular product of the Australian-funded Climate and Ocean Support Program in the Pacific (COSPPac). The Pacific Community (SPC) has been designing and producing the tide prediction calendars over the past 3 years in partnership with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. The new predictions for Vaitupu were calculated using tide gauge data collected by SPC in 2015 under the European Union-funded Climate and Abstraction Impact Assessment (CAIA) project.

Perceived Major Threats to Island Biodiversity 2021-07-06

Biodiversity threats biodiversity funafuti nanumaga nanumea niutao

Perceived threats can be summarised as arising from deleterious human actions and negative attitudes to the environment, leading to inappropriate behaviour, such as littering, over-fishing and hunting, using fishing nets and modern fishing method, the use of guns and the introduction of pests; the use of inappropriate technologies, such as solid and liquid waste water disposal systems; uncontrolled use of resources and control of livestock; increasing consumption patterns, arising from increases in human populations, demands and changing lifestyles; institutional weaknesses; ignorance and lack of knowledge; natural factors and climate change.

Rainfall Trends, Drought Frequency and La Niña in Tuvalu 2021-07-06

Atmosphere and Climate rainfall drought la nina seasonal cycle sea surface temperature de-trended rainfall

This study addresses rainfall trends, the frequency of droughts, La Niña influences and the relationship between rainfall and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in Tuvalu. The findings revealed that; * de-trended rainfall time series show declining trends in all four rainfall stations over the period 1953-2012; * the frequency of drought ranges from three to fourteen years with a mean of nine years * the occurrence of drought appears to follow the La Niña years * boplots provide an effective option for defining drought * there is empirical support for a moderate to strong correlation between the de-trended values of SST and rainfall in the area of study

Bathymetric Mapping Survey on all nine atolls of Tuvalu 2021-07-06

Coastal and Marine bathymetry water depths seafloor mbes multibeam echosounder geomorphology submarine landslide oceanography marine survey nanumea niutao nanumaga nui vatupu nukufetau funafuti nukulaelae niulakita seabed

This report describes the high-resolution bathymetric mapping survey carried out in 2004. The survey achieved good coverage of the seafloor from approximately 10 m depth in the nearshore reef slope area, to an average offshore depth of some 2000 m, at an average slope angle of 2. The objective was to investigate the seabed and provide information about water depths around the islands using a multibeam echosounder (MBES).

Te Kaeega III 2021-07-06

Biodiversity national strategy for sustainable development 2016 to 2020 sustainable development plan

In TKIII, three ideas form the basis for strategic planning. The first is that TKIII methods and targets are based on: 1) Tuvalu’s own development perceptions and needs, which are linked with the UN SDGs , the SIDS Samoa Pathway , and the UNFCCC’s Paris Agreement (the successor to the Kyoto Protocol), to be adopted in April 2016; 2) a commitment by knowledgeable public officials under the terms and conditions of their appointments to give advice to the best of their professional ability; and 3) political leaders who have constitutional decision-making authority to act in the country’s best interest.

Anthropogenic Impacts on Water quality of the lagoonal coast of Fongafale Islet 2021-07-06

Inland Waters water water pollution redox escherichia coli fongafale islet waste water septic tank anthropogenic impacts coastal conservation

This paper investigates the water quality of the densely populated lagoonal coasts in Fongafale Islet, and the occurrence of water pollution. A comparison was then made with less populated natural coast in the islet. The primary pollution sources and pollution mechanism were identified. Through this investigation, the need for effective water quality control measures for coastal conservation is demonstrated.

Niutao Port Harbor 2021-07-06

Biodiversity Built Environment Coastal and Marine 2018 niutao port harbor adb oimip iee eia emp boat harbor environment cardno tuvalu mct infrastructure

The project. The Outer Island Maritime Infrastructure Project – Additional Financing (the project) will continue the efforts of the Government of Tuvalu (the government) with support from Asian Development Bank (ADB) to rehabilitate and improve maritime infrastructure on outer islands. The Outer Islands Maritime Infrastructure Project is improving infrastructure on Nukulaelae, Nanumaga and Niutao which was damaged by Tropical Cyclone Pam in March 2015. The government has requested ADB to provide additional financing for: (i) cost overruns resulting from contract variations and foreign exchange fluctuations; and (ii) provision of passenger facilities at Nukulaelae and construction of a small boat harbor at Niutao. The original project is financing (i) a small boat harbour construction in Nukulaelae and rehabilitating boat ramps in Nanumaga and Niutao, (ii) institutional strengthening for government’s asset management focusing on the sustainability of project deliveries, and (iii) the preparation of transport master planning. The ongoing project is being successfully implemented with all contracts awarded for the works, the project support and master planning, and project management staff have been awarded. There are no docking facilities on Niutao for either of the three government-owned ships or the small workboats used to transfer people and cargo from the ship to the shore. Passenger transfers between vessels are often dangerous while movement of cargo is very labour intensive and carried in manageable pieces though the water to the shore. The small workboat harbour will involve the dredging of a new channel and turning bay for the work boats. The construction of breakwaters involve using precast concrete elements, with wharf and jetty raised on piles to reduce the impact on coastal processes within the reef environment. There will be ancillary buildings for cargo near the jetty to assist in the safe movement of passengers and cargo from the land to the ship.

State of Conservation Report - Tuvalu 2021-07-06

Biodiversity Coastal and Marine Inland Waters indicators conservation state of conservation report regional soe soco

For the Ninth Pacific Islands Conference on Nature Conservation and Protected Areas December 2013, Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) commissioned an assessment of the status of biodiversity and conservation in Oceania. This report assesses the overall state of conservation in Tuvalu using 16 indicators. *this report wasn't published but was sent to country for checking (2013)* - to be used for the Regional SOE initiative 2019

Tuvalu Renewable Energy Study - Current Energy Use and Potential for Renewable Energies 2021-07-06

Atmosphere and Climate Built Environment solar fossil fuels greenhouse gas climate change

Tuvalu’s environment is under pressure: sea-water rise contaminating the soil with salt, direct impact on waste and sewage systems from rising human density contributing to further damage. The 1987 UN Brundlandt report has definitely shown the existing link between environment/ecology and development /economy. Tomorrow’s economy stems from today’s environment. Investing in the quality of soil, avoiding water pollution, protecting natural resources especially energy sources as well as fighting against climate change will largely determine the success of Tuvalu’s development for this new century. The current study concerning renewable energy potential and implementation in Tuvalu is at the crossroad of 2 issues, each with major strategic implications: climate change threats and worldwide oil crises. Given this context, what can renewable energy contribute to Tuvalu’s benefit? Analysis of Tuvalu’s energy consumption reveals the following characteristics: • Tuvalu’s economy is almost totally dependant on oil. Only around 18% comes from local biomass resources, which is not accounted for in official statistics and is not the object of any active policy. • Consumption for transportation: primarily sea transport and recently, road transport, account for over 50% of total current energy consumption. • Prime importance of electricity production: courtesy of a Japanese aid program, an initiative to reinforce production with new diesel generators is slated to be implemented on Funafuti in 2006 continuing Tuvalu’s dependence on imported oil. • The 3rd highest energy consumption, thermal use (cooking, boiling water for drinking, sanitary hot water), is mainly provided by biomass.

Practical training in sustainable sanitation for Tuvalu 2021-07-06

Built Environment waste water

Under the International Waters Project (IWP) in Tuvalu, a pilot project was established to address “waste” with the aim of reducing the contamination of groundwater and coastal water by human and animal waste. Community-based activities included “low-tech” solutions to addressing environmental degradation while national level activities involved activities with a more strategic institutional focus. A Communications and Sanitation Training Programme was designed to investigate the current understanding of poor sanitation in Tuvalu, raise awareness of its cost to public and environmental health, and promote possible solutions.

OpenStreetMap Data Tuvalu 2021-07-06

osm gis spatial open source pacific map

OpenStreetMap (OSM) is a free, editable map & spatial database of the whole world. This dataset is an extract of OpenStreetMap data for Tuvalu in a GIS-friendly format. The OSM data has been split into separate layers based on themes (buildings, roads, points of interest, etc), and it comes bundled with a QGIS project and styles, to help you get started with using the data in your maps. This OSM product will be updated weekly. The goal is to increase awareness among Pacific GIS users of the richness of OpenStreetMap data in Pacific countries, as well as the gaps, so that they can take advantage of this free resource, become interested in contributing to OSM, and perhaps join the global OSM community.

World Database on Protected Areas 2021-07-06

Land Biodiversity Coastal and Marine gis geo data protected areas wdpa conservation biopama2 marine terrestrial

The World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) is the most comprehensive global database of marine and terrestrial protected areas, updated on a monthly basis, and is one of the key global biodiversity data sets being widely used by scientists, businesses, governments, International secretariats and others to inform planning, policy decisions and management. The WDPA is a joint project between UN Environment and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The compilation and management of the WDPA is carried out by UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC), in collaboration with governments, non-governmental organisations, academia and industry. There are monthly updates of the data which are made available online through the Protected Planet website where the data is both viewable and downloadable. Data and information on the world's protected areas compiled in the WDPA are used for reporting to the Convention on Biological Diversity on progress towards reaching the Aichi Biodiversity Targets (particularly Target 11), to the UN to track progress towards the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, to some of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) core indicators, and other international assessments and reports including the Global Biodiversity Outlook, as well as for the publication of the United Nations List of Protected Areas. Every two years, UNEP-WCMC releases the Protected Planet Report on the status of the world's protected areas and recommendations on how to meet international goals and targets. Many platforms are incorporating the WDPA to provide integrated information to diverse users, including businesses and governments, in a range of sectors including mining, oil and gas, and finance. For example, the WDPA is included in the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool, an innovative decision support tool that gives users easy access to up-to-date information that allows them to identify biodiversity risks and opportunities within a project boundary. The reach of the WDPA is further enhanced in services developed by other parties, such as the Global Forest Watch and the Digital Observatory for Protected Areas, which provide decision makers with access to monitoring and alert systems that allow whole landscapes to be managed better. Together, these applications of the WDPA demonstrate the growing value and significance of the Protected Planet initiative.

ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) Version 3 (ASTGTM) - Tuvalu 2021-07-06

Land Inland Waters geo gis data conservation biopama2 elevation hillshade dem gdem aster

The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) Version 3 (ASTGTM) provides a global digital elevation model (DEM) of land areas on Earth at a spatial resolution of 1 arc second (approximately 30 meter horizontal posting at the equator). The development of the ASTER GDEM data products is a collaborative effort between National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI). The ASTER GDEM data products are created by the Sensor Information Laboratory Corporation (SILC) in Tokyo. The ASTER GDEM Version 3 data product was created from the automated processing of the entire ASTER Level 1A archive of scenes acquired between March 1, 2000, and November 30, 2013. Stereo correlation was used to produce over one million individual scene based ASTER DEMs, to which cloud masking was applied. All cloud screened DEMs and non-cloud screened DEMs were stacked. Residual bad values and outliers were removed. In areas with limited data stacking, several existing reference DEMs were used to supplement ASTER data to correct for residual anomalies. Selected data were averaged to create final pixel values before partitioning the data into 1° by 1° tiles with a one pixel overlap. To correct elevation values of water body surfaces, the ASTER Global Water Bodies Database (ASTWBD) Version 1 data product was also generated. The geographic coverage of the ASTER GDEM extends from 83° North to 83° South. Each tile is distributed in GeoTIFF format and projected on the 1984 World Geodetic System (WGS84)/1996 Earth Gravitational Model (EGM96) geoid. Each of the 22,912 tiles in the collection contain at least 0.01% land area.

Sentinel-2 Satellite Imagery - Tuvalu 2021-07-06

Land Coastal and Marine geo gis data conservation biopama2 satellite imagery sentinel-2 earth observation

SENTINEL-2 is a wide-swath, high-resolution, multi-spectral imaging mission, supporting Copernicus Land Monitoring studies, including the monitoring of vegetation, soil and water cover, as well as observation of inland waterways and coastal areas. The SENTINEL-2 Multispectral Instrument (MSI) samples 13 spectral bands: four bands at 10 metres, six bands at 20 metres and three bands at 60 metres spatial resolution. The acquired data, mission coverage and high revisit frequency provides for the generation of geoinformation at local, regional, national and international scales. The data is designed to be modified and adapted by users interested in thematic areas such as: • spatial planning • agro-environmental monitoring • water monitoring • forest and vegetation monitoring • land carbon, natural resource monitoring • global crop monitoring

Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA): guidelines for Pacific island countries and territories 2021-05-28

Atmosphere and Climate Land Biodiversity Built Environment Coastal and Marine Culture and Heritage Inland Waters development eia environmental impact assessment logging mining

This publication ‘Strategic Environmental Assessment – Guidelines for Pacific Island Countries and
Territories’ has been prepared to provide guidance on the application of SEA as a tool to support
environmental planning, policy and informed decision making. It provides background on the use and
benefits of SEA as well as providing tips and guiding steps on the process, including case studies, toolkits
and checklists for conducting an SEA in the Appendices.

These guidelines are intended to assist the national and local authorities such as Environment
Agencies and National Planning Offices, development control agencies, municipal authorities, provincial
administrations and Strategic Development Offices in Pacific Island Countries and Territories with
an understanding of what Strategic Environmental Assessment is, the benefits that can be achieved
through its targeted use, and how and when to apply it to ensure that environmental and social matters
are integrated into policies, plans, programmes and projects. The guidelines can also be used by
other government sectors in terms of developing and implementing new policies and programs for the
government. These guidelines can also provide useful assistance to non-governmental organisations,
communities and all those seeking to broaden their capacities, with a view of better informed public
participation in strategic planning.

The sacred dimension of protected areas: proceedings of the Second workshop of the Delos Initiative - Ouranoupolis 2007 2010-04-09

biodiversity management conservation conservation of natural resources environment protection nature conservation parks parks - oceania - pacific protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

As environmental problems continue to increase at an ever more rapid rate, exacerbated by the major threat of global climate change, the need for widespread remedial action is becoming ever more pressing. Scientific consensus on both the root causes of these problems and the measures required to tackle them is growing, while mass media and public interest has reached fever pitch. Of course, while this has put pressure on decisionmakers to take positive action, the realisation of the gravity and extent of the environmental problems has encouraged all those concerned about the state of our world to search for partners around it: one such significant partnership to e­merge in recent years is between those concerned with the conservation of nature –and of its biodiversity– and the custodians of sacred sites, representing both indigenous beliefs and mainstream faiths.

1 copy|also available online

Call Number: 333.783 PAP [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-2-8317-1166-9

Physical Description: 262 p. ; 25 cm

State of the Environment and Conservation in the Pacific Islands: 2020 Regional Report: Indicators 19-20 - Managing invasive species in the Pacific 2021-03-11

biodiversity - invasive species - red list managing - invasive species - oceania

Invasive species are the primary cause of extinction on islands (IUCN Red List 2020, SPREP 2016, SOCO 2017). Invasive species have been formally identified as a threat for 1,531 species in the Pacific islands region to date (IUCN Red List, 2020). Pacific leaders have established two core regional indicators for invasive species management. Efforts for invasive management are ongoing in almost all Pacific island countries and territories. Invasive species management is recognised globally and is increasingly being used in Oceania to protect native biodiversity, natural resources, food security, economic development, human health, and ecosystem services, such as water resources, nutrient cycles, and regulated erosion and fire regimes.

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 5 p.

State of environment and conservation in the Pacific Islands: 2020 regional report. 2021-03-11

conservation of natural resources – management – oceania environmental protection – oceania natural resources – conservation – oceania

Pacific islands are hotspots of unique biodiversity. Our ancestral traditions are linked
to nature. However, these traditions, the natural environment, and biodiversity are
threatened by changing global and regional environmental pressures, ecological
degradation, growing human populations, changing demands of our societies, and the
impacts of climate change and sea level rise.

Call Number: [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-982-04-0905-7,978-982-04-0906-4

Physical Description: 156 p. 29 cm.

Case study: The Funafuti Conservation Area, Funafuti atoll, Tuvalu : drawing lessons for future marine conservation planning and management 2010-05-18

conservation area - planning - management - tuvalu marine conservation areas - tuvalu

Marine protected areas (MPAs) have gained wide acceptance among coastal planners,
managers, researchers, and scientists as an effective tool that can be utilized to protect
threatened marine and coastal ecosystems. MPAs allow depleted breeding stocks of
important food fish and invertebrate species to regenerate and become re-established,
providing a foundation for sustainable fisheries. Typically, the MPA model comprises a core
“’no-take” conservation area, within which harvest of fish and other consumable resources is
strictly prohibited, and a surrounding “buffer zone” in which non-intensive fishing practices
are permitted. The full commitment and participation of the local community in planning,
design, and implementation can ensure the long-term viability of such projects.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 78 p.

Session 29: How to Ensure the Transmission of Traditional-Knowledge as a way to preserve biodiversity in the Pacific 2021-03-19

Biodiversity pacific nature conference perservation biodiversity - traditional knowledge - oceania

Traditional way of life in the pacific islands in the expression of each and everybody's identity. The link between people and their natural habitat, living and unliving things is key to someone's social status, relationship to other member of its community and existence in the world. The session shall look at the importance of traditional knowledge and its relation to the environment as a way to protect existing biodiversity and thus ensuring that the cultural heritage of Pacific Island population i preserved. The issue of the modification of natural ecosystems, fauna and flora and hoe the traditions shall adapt to this situation if key to understanding the challenging the region will be facing in the coming years.

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 1:06:54

State of the Environment and Conservation in the Pacific Islands: 2020 Regional Report: Indicator 5 - Freshwater Quality 2021-03-11

freshwater - quality - land

There are active drinking water or freshwater monitoring progra mmes in 11 of 14 Pacific countries and 6 of 7 territories. The primary challenge is the regularity and frequency of sampling, the capacity to process samples accurately in country, and the official response process to the findings. There is no regional data collation for this proposed indicator , to date. Escherichia coli occurs naturally in human and animal intestines and therefore can be used as a proxy for untreated sewage contamination or other pollution.

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 3 p.

Report on the preliminary meeting for the joint SCBD/SPREP regional capacity-building workshop on implementation NBSAPs and mainstreaming biodiversity in the Pacific (19th October 2007, Alotau, Papua New Guinea : [presented at] Regional capacity developme 2009-03-20

Biodiversity biodiversity - national plans - oceania biological diversity - covention

One of the recommendations emerging from the COP-8 (Decision XIII/8 [6]) promoted a series of regional and/or sub-regional workshops on capacity building for NBSAPs. These will
be held with the aim to discuss national experiences in implementing NBSAPs, the integration of biodiversity concerns into relevant sectors, obstacles, and ways and means
for overcoming these obstacles. It was recommended that these workshops be held (subject to the availability of funding) prior to COP-9, to provide an opportunity to directly support
Parties in their implementation and mainstreaming efforts. The recommendation to hold this series of sub-regional workshops was reinforced by recommendation 2 / 1 of the Working Group on Review of Implementation, at its second meeting which was held from 9 - 13 July 2007.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 8 Pages

The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity for National and International Policy Makers: summary responding to the Value of Nature 2010-01-26

Biodiversity biodiversity - economics ecosystems - economics natural resources - economics

Natural capital – our ecosystems, biodiversity, and natural resources – underpins economies, societies and individual well-being. The values of its myriad benefits are, however, often overlooked or poorly understood. They are rarely taken fully into account through economic signals in markets, or in day to day decisions by business and citizens, nor indeed reflected adequately in the accounts of society.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-3-98-13410-0-3

Physical Description: 47 p.

Landscape-scale conservation in the Congo Basin: lessons learned 2010-10-18

Land conservation landscape

To introduce this collection of studies, a logical first question to ask is why produce a “lessons learned” publication? The initial impetus for this initiative was an observation by an external evaluation of CARPE that there was relatively little sharing of information within the programme between numerous actors and sites concerning the conservation strategies undertaken and the results achieved (Weidemann Consortium, 2006).1 The evaluation concluded that this lack of information exchange was a threat to the success of CARPE as a large-scale regional programme, a view that was confirmed by programme partners during the CARPE Phase IIB Inception workshop that was held in Yaoundé in February 2007.

1 copy|also available online

Call Number: 333.7 YAN [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-2-8317-1288-8

Physical Description: xvi, 262 p. ; 29 cm

State of the Environment and Conservation in the Pacific Islands: 2020 Regional Report: Indicator 6 - Land under cultivation 2021-03-11

land land - cultivation - oceania

Agriculture is a foundational industry in Pacific island economi es and central to the independence of island communities. Together, agriculture, forestry and fishing provide from 3% to over 25% of the GDP of Pacific island countries, with a regional average of 17% (World Bank 2020), and agriculture accounts for a large share of employment (ADB 2015). The status of the region’s land under cultivation was deemed fair to good, based on national estimations in national State of Environment reporting (seven countries) and given the use of over 20% of land for agriculture in over half of the islands.

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 3 p.

The Virtual 10th Pacific Islands Conference on Nature Conservation and Protected Areas : 24-27 November 2020 2021-03-29

conservation - protected areas pacific nature conference

In order to showcase knowledge and solutions related to nature conservation action in the Pacific Islands, the original face-to-face conference provided space in its programme for 61 parallel sessions, each with a duration of 1 hour and 30 minutes.

By going virtual a lot of that space in teh agenda was lost, but we still wanted to bring those stories! By creating a virtual galleries on the website and by the event feed on the conference platform, we were able to provide new and open spaces for lightning stories to be told and striking facts to be shared!

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 24 p.

Tropical mammal functional diversity increases with productivity but decreases with anthropogenic disturbance 2021-03-05

Land Biodiversity rainforest conservation - biodiversity - global

Avariety of factors can affect the biodiversity of tropicalmammal communities,
but their relative importance and directionality remain uncertain. Previous
global investigations of mammal functional diversity have relied on range
maps instead of observational data to determine community composition. We
test the effects of species pools, habitat heterogeneity, primary productivity
and human disturbance on the functional diversity (dispersion and richness)
of mammal communities using the largest standardized tropical forest camera
trap monitoring system, the Tropical Ecology Assessment and Monitoring
(TEAM) Network.

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 8 p.

Biodiversity scenarios: projections of 21st century change in Biodiversity and associated Ecosystem Services: a technical report for the Global Biodiversity Outlook 3 2010-05-12

Biodiversity biodiversity - ecosystems services global biodiversity outlook

This synthesis focuses on estimates of biodiversity change as projected for the 21st century by models or
extrapolations based on experiments and observed trends. The term “biodiversity” is used in a broad
sense as it is defined in the Convention on Biological Diversity to mean the abundance and distributions
of and interactions between genotypes, species, communities, ecosystems and biomes. This synthesis
pays particular attention to the interactions between biodiversity and ecosystem services and to
critical “tipping points” that could lead to large, rapid and potentially irreversible changes. Comparisons
between models are used to estimate the range of projections and to identify sources of uncertainty.
Experiments and observed trends are used to check the plausibility of these projections. In addition
we have identified possible actions at the local, national and international levels that can be taken to
conserve biodiversity. We have called on a wide range of scientists to participate in this synthesis, with
the objective to provide decision makers with messages that reflect the consensus of the scientific community
and that will aid in the development of policy and management strategies that are ambitious,
forward looking and proactive.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 92-9225-219-4

Physical Description: 134 p.

Marine biodiversity law in Fiji, Solomon and Vanuatu Islands : final report 2010-03-02

Coastal and Marine Biodiversity marine biodiversity - law - fiji marine biodiversity - law - solomon marine biodiversity - law - vanuatu islands

The research agreement signed on 19th December 2005 by the Institute of Research for Development (IRD), the University Paul Sabatier (Toulouse III) and Nantes University, the Pharmacochemical laboratories of Natural Substances and Pharmacophores Redox (UMR 1165) and the Centre of Maritime and Ocean Law (EA 1165, CDMO) led to the international research program “Coral Reef Initiatives for the Pacific” (CRISP). Within the CRISP program, the research work was incorporated under component 2C: Bioprospection and marine active substances, CDMO being in charge of the section: Legal aspects related to the valorization of marine biodiversity

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 96 p.

The International Journal of Protected Areas and Conservation - Developing capacity for a protected planet 2021-03-18

conservation areas - protected lands - global pandemic - covid-19 - global

This introduction provides an overview and commentary on the papers in a special issue of PARKS, which is devoted
to the impact and implications of COVID-19 on the world’s protected and conserved areas. It describes how 11 peerreviewed
papers and 14 essays have brought together the knowledge and findings of numerous experts from all parts
of the world, supported by several wide-ranging surveys. The resulting global synthesis of experience answers some
key questions: why did the pandemic occur? what has it meant for protected and conserved areas, and the people
that depend on them? what were the underlying reasons for the disaster we now face? and how can we avoid this
happening again? We applaud the international effort to combat the disease but suggest that humanity urgently
needs to devote as much effort to addressing the root causes of the pandemic – our fractured relationship to nature.
Unless we repair it, humanity will face consequences even worse than this pandemic.

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 200 p.

Strategies and financial mechanisms for sustainable use and conservation of forests: experiences from Latin America and Asia, Proceedings of an Inter-Regional Workshop Chiang Mai, Thailand, 20-22 November, 2006 2010-03-26

Land conservation of forests

With increasing globalization of markets, rising environmental awareness, and attention from international conventions and agreements, the vast majority of countries are looking into managing their forests more sustainably. The main limitation appears to be lack of funding for improving forest management. Traditional sources include the government, targeted investments from the private sector, international donor support, and contributions in kind from rural communities. But these are grossly inadequate, and additional finances are required. Alternative financing arrangements are being developed and tested in many countries. They include a vast array of schemes such as conservation concessions, debt-for nature-swaps, payments for environmental services, including “green funds” (payments for carbon offsets), and compensatory payments, to cite a few. However, the roles, priorities, and requirements of the various funding entities remain unclear to the vast majority of individuals involved in forest management activities. This introduction touches on the array of schemes being tested. The rest of the papers in this proceeding highlight specific schemes which are gathering interest for financing sustainable forest management.

Available online|Includes chapter on Fiji: Financing instruments and financing strategies for sustainable forest management in the Fiji Islands p.88-101

Call Number: [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-92-5-106463-4

Physical Description: 140 p.

State of Environment and Conservation in the Pacific Islands - 2020 Regional Report 2021-03-19

Atmosphere and Climate Land Biodiversity Built Environment Coastal and Marine Culture and Heritage Inland Waters conservation indicators inform pacific pacific nature regional soe regional state of environment report soe soec

This first state of the environment report for the Pacific region uses regional environment indicators to assess the status, trends, and data quality and availability for the endorsed Pacific environmental priorities. This report also includes an update of the State of Conservation in Oceania report produced in 2013, which was endorsed and published in 2017.

"In this assessment of the state of the Pacific environment and conservation using endorsed regional indicators, we seek to lay the groundwork for sustained monitoring that supports action and measures Pacific success as well as our shortfalls in achieving environmentally sustainable development"

Regional Environmental Indicator Assessments : 2020 Report 2021-03-19

Atmosphere and Climate Land Biodiversity Built Environment Coastal and Marine Culture and Heritage Inland Waters 2020 biodiversity environmental indicators hazardous waste indicators regional report sewage treament soec state of environment report

This dataset hosts 31 individual environmental indicator assessments that are in the State of Environment and Conservation in the Pacific Islands : 2020 Regional report.

Regional indicators are used to understand the current status of conservation in the region and to establish a process for periodic reviews of the status of biodiversity and implementation of environmental management measures in the Pacific islands region.

Each Pacific regional indicator is assessed with regard to:

  • its present status, outlining the current health of key habitat types and resources across the region as well as data availability for the present and future assessments;

  • pressures relating to the dominant factors and drivers of socio-environmental change affecting biodiversity, with an emphasis on recent changes, and opportunities relating to management, knowledge generation, or socio-ecological benefits of progress towards the target outcome; and

  • response recommendations, describing action to improve the health and sustainability of Pacific biodiversity and ecosystems.

Pacific Islands Framework for Nature Conservation and Protected Areas 2021- 2025 DRAFT 2021-03-18

Biodiversity biodoversity framework nature

This Pacific Islands Framework for Nature Conservation and Protected Areas2021-2025 is the principal
regional strategy document for environmental conservation in the Pacific. Its purpose is to guide broad
strategic guidance for nature conservation planning, prioritisation, and implementation in our region. It
reflects the urgent need for transformative action in response to the multiple accelerating threats, both
established and emerging, that are faced by nature and people in the Pacific.

Vemööre Declaration : Commitments to nature conservation action in the Pacific Islands region, 2021-2025 2021-03-18

Biodiversity #biodiversity 2025 biodiversity commitment declaration nature conference vemööre declaration

“Vemööre” is a term in the Kwenyï language spoken by people from the Isle of Pines in New Caledonia. It is used to highlight a collective commitment and responsibility to implement the principles of life, to preserve balance, to build alliances, and to respect the word between people and between the spirits of our environment.

The Declaration directly states that the global biodiversity crisis is an “existential threat to the Pacific Ocean, the Pacific islands, and to Pacific peoples”. Under the Vemööre Declaration, Pacific island countries and territories declared that the global biodiversity crisis is urgent and that transformative action must not be delayed, as the crisis is an existential threat to the Pacific Ocean, the Pacific islands, and to Pacific peoples.

The International Year of Biodiversity - 2010: implementation strategy 2008-07-25

biological diversity - convention biological diversity - implementation strategy

This document outlines the activities that the Secretariat plans to undertake to support the IYB. Some of these have already begun and others are in development. The paper includes suggestions as to actions that other partners may take to advance the celebrations of the IYB.
The end result of the IYB celebration will be action at various levels as a result of targeted "public awareness" campaigns in collaboration with a number of partners. A comprehensive
evaluation will be undertaken early in 2011 to measure the quality and quantity of the impact of IYB events. A report will be submitted to the United Nations General Assembly in fall 2011.

Available online|(* NB these materials are also available on the workshop CDROM deposited with the IRC – NBSAP workshop Nadi, Feb 2009)

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 26 p.

Guidance for promoting synergy, among activities addressing biological diversity, desertification, land degradation and climate change 2009-02-23

biological diversity climate change desertification land degradation

As noted in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, climate change is one of the most important drivers of biodiversity loss" and is projected to further adversely affect the role of
biodiversity as a source of goods and services. The impacts of climate change on biodiversity have been of major concern to the Convention on Biological Diversity since 2002 when, following a request from the Conference of the Parties and the Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA), an Ad Hoc Technical Expert Group was established to carry
out an assessment of the interlinkages between biodiversity and climate change. The report was completed in 2003 and focused primarily on the impacts of climate change mitigation options on
biodiversity, and the links between them, in the context of the Kyoto Protocol.

Available online|(* NB these materials are also available on the workshop CDROM deposited with the IRC – NBSAP workshop Nadi, Feb 2009)

Call Number: [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 92-9225-050-7

Physical Description: iv, 43 p

Botanique de l'ile de Tupai, iles de la societe par 2008-05-14

no keyword provided

Lilie de Tupai ou Motu~Iti (16°15’S, 15l°50,W), l’un des cinq atolls des lies de la Societe, est, apres Bellingshausen (souvent ecrit Belling- hausen) (15°45’S, 154°33’W), le plus au nord de cet archipel, a 280 km NNW de Papeete. C'est grace a l'amabilite de son proprietaire, Maltre Marcel Lejeune, et a l'interet qu'il porte aux travaux scientifiques que j'ai
pu y sejourner en Dec. 1974 et Mars 1983 (et F. R. Fosberg en Juin 1981). Qu'il veuille bien trouver ici, ainsi que son fils, l'expression de ma reconnaissance pour son hospitalite. J’ai beneficie aussi de la gentillesse et des connaissances sur les plantes des residents de l'fle et, en 1983, de 1'assistance de mon collegue Bruno Delesalle, et je les en remercie. Bernard Salvat, qui visita Tupai en Juin 1983 m’a communique
ses photographies dont certaines sont reproduites ici, ce done je lui suis bien reconnaissante.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 37 p.

Eradicating rats from Maninita Island, Vava'u, Kindgom of Tonga 2008-08-07

Biodiversity invasive species - eradication - tonga rats - eradication - tonga

In June/July 2002 an eradication programme to remove Pacific rats from Maninita Island in the Vava'u group of the Kingdom of Tonga was initiated. The techniques used were similar to those
used in successful rat eradications in New Zealand, in that Pestoff 20R pellets and a network of bait stations were used.
Conditions on the island were not what was expected, the forest having been adversely affected by cyclone Waka and subsequent defoliation by caterpillars, resulting in an open forest canopy. Rats were found to be present on the island in high numbers and were breeding.
At this stage it appears that the operation was successful, as no rats were caught in monitoring trapping after 20 days of operations, although follow-up monitoring needs to be carried out in late 2002 to confirm this. There appears to have been no negative impact on non-target species.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 13 p.

Pacific Adaptation to climate change PIMS 2162 2009-04-15

climate change - oceania

Climate change adaptation is vital for Pacific SIDS. Long-term effects, including the increasing frequency and severity of extreme events such as high rainfall, droughts, tropical cyclones, and storm surges are affecting the people in this region. Coupled with non-climate drivers, such as inappropriate land use, overexploitation of resources, increasing urbanization and population increase, development in the region is increasingly undermined. For the low lying atolls, the likely economic disruption from climate change pressures could be catastrophic and potentially lead to population relocation and therefore social and cultural disruption and disproportion. Failure to reduce vulnerability may result in loss of future risk management opportunities when impacts may be greater and options fewer.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 136 p.

Pacific Invasive Learning Network Pilot programme, May 2006-May 2008 2008-11-24

Biodiversity invasive learning network

Work is based around country visits by the network coordinator to support PILN teams to identify and take strategic action to manage their priority invasive species. The network is functioning by sharing awareness of successful activities being earned out by the teams, providing the mechanism for other teams to do the same, and actively encouraging them to do so.
Capacity building is linked to on-going invasive species projects and achieved through workshops and exchanges.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 44 p.

Implementing STD on a small island: development and use of Sustainable Tourism Development indicators in Samoa 2008-05-02

ecotourism - samoa environment - protection - samoa natural resources - management - samoa tourism - sustainable development - samoa

Small island states present a significant challenge in terms of sustainable tourism development. On a small island there are limited resources, economic and social activities tend to be concentrated on the coastal zone, and the interconnectivity between economic, environmental, social, cultural and political spheres is strong and pervasive. Consequently the sustainable development of tourism is more a practical necessity than an optional extra. This paper investigates the question of how to monitor sustainable tourism development (STD) in Samoa, an independent small island state in the South Pacific. It describes some of the methodological considerations and processes involved in the development of STD indicators and particularly highlights the importance of formulating clear objectives before trying to identify indicators, the value of
establishing a multi-disciplinary advisory panel, and the necessity of designing an effective and flexible implementation framework for converting indicator results into management action.

Available online and also kept in vertical file collection

Call Number: VF 6920 [EL]

Physical Description: 24 p. ; 29cm

Supplementary livelihood options for Pacific Island Communities: a review of experiences 2008-05-19

livelihoods

This report presents results from the Supplementary Livelihoods Options for Pacific Island Communities (SLOPIC) study, carried out by the Foundation of the Peoples of the South Pacific
International (FSPI) using New Zealand Aid (NZAid) core
funds.
The main aim of this study was to review supplementary livelihood (SL) projects that have taken place across the South Pacific over the past 5 to 10 years, with a view to extracting 'lessons learned' and identifying the determinants of success.

Draft available online|Final copy is hard copy kept at 333.7 GAR|3 copies

Call Number: 333. 7 GAR [EL]

Physical Description: 52 p.

The reptiles of Kapingamarangi atoll, Micronesia 2008-05-07

fauna - micronesia reptiles - micronesia

Two species of sea turtles and eight lizards comprise the herpetofauna of Kapingamarangi Atoll; the giant Micronesian gecko (Perochirus scutellatus) is unknown elsewhere. The mourning gecko (Lepidodactylus lugubris), oceanic gecko (Gehyra
oceanica), and azure-tailed copper-striped skink (Emoia impar) are the most common and widespread species, being recorded on 100%, 97%, and 87% of the 31 islands, respectively. The stump-toed gecko (Gehyra mutilata) and the Pacific blue-tailed skink
(Emoia caeruleocauda), both known from only a scattering of older records from the most densely inhabited and most frequently visited islands, may be extirpated or possibly still
exist locally in very small numbers. Sea turtles are rare and none was observed during the present study, but local residents indicate they were more numerous in the past.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 10 Pages

National water resources policy: water for healthy communities, environments and sustainable development 2009-03-24

healthy communities environments - kiribati sustainable development - kiribati water resources policy - kiribati

The NWRP provides a framework for leadership and coordinated action in the supply of safe, adequate and financially, technically and environmentally sustainable water services to rural, outer island and urban communities in Kiribati and for the protection, conservation, sustainable use and efficient management of Kiribati's water resources. It is directed at improving the welfare and livelihood of I-Kiribati and represents the vision of the Government of Kiribati (GoK) for the water sector.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 14 p.

Atolls as settlement landscapes: Ujae, Marshall Islands 2008-05-06

Land Biodiversity landscapes - settlement - marshall islands

Williamson and Sabath (1982) have demonstrated a significant relationship between modern population size and environment by examining atoll area and rainfall in the Marshall Islands. The present work seeks to extend that argument into prehistory by examining the relationship of ancient habitation sites and size of aroid pit agricultural systems to atoll land area and rainfall regime along the 1,500-3,500 mm precipitation gradient in the Marshall Islands. Four atolls were selected for study: Ebon at the wettest extent in the extreme south; Ujae and Maloelap near the center of the archipelago; and Utrok at the dry north. The first phase of this long-term archaeological program is reported. During the survey of Ujae Atoll (90 05' N, 165° 40' E), three habitation sites, an aroid pit agricultural zone, one early historic burial, and seven fish traps, weirs, and enclosures were recorded. Along with excavations at
two habitation sites (8 m2 total area), 35 traditional artifacts were recovered (shell adzes, ornaments, and manufacturing tools). Seven radiocarbon age determinations document land
use beginning as early as the third century A.D. A beachrock sample dated to 2450 ± 70 BP relates to atoll development. Some 4,748 bones of fish, birds, turtles, Pacific rats, lizards,
humans, and possible cetaceans, along with nearly 13 kg of shellfish, provide the basis for understanding prehistoric subsistence, human adaptations to the atoll setting, and land use patterns.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 53 p.

Climate change and social change: vulnerability and adaptation in rural Vanuatu / Olivia Warrick 2009-03-30

climate change - adapation - vanuatu climate change - social change - vanuatu climate change - vulnerability - vanuatu

What is the nature of vulnerability and resilience to climate change at the community scale in Pacific island countries (PICs)? What approaches to climate change adaptation
are most appropriate at this scale? These questions are examined in the context of rural Vanuatu, a Melanesian least developed country particularly susceptible to changes in climate variability and extremes. Fieldwork on the islands of Santo. Efate and Mota Lava interpreted vulnerability by beginning with local perceptions and experiences of dealing with climate risks. Vulnerability to climate arises from a context of rapid social change. Predominantly 'non-climate' factors such as population growth, land issues, changing traditional governance and eroding traditional knowledge are linked to changing agricultural practices, natural resource degradation, and increasing reliance on imports. These factors and processes affect the ways and degree to which communities are able to cope with climate stresses such as tropical cyclones, drought and heavy rain. However, research findings challenge the common notion that Pacific Island communities are inherently vulnerable; each community engages endogenous mechanisms of resilience.
Aspects of this resilience may be threatened however especially where resilience depends on flexibility and self sufficiency, and particularly given increasing climatic uncertainty
in the future, hi this context therefore, 'adaptation to climate change' requires communities to adapt to both changing climatic and social situations.

Available online|Draft - not for citation or quotation without permission of author

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 24 p.

Interisland movements of fruit bats (Pteropus Mariannus) in the Mariana Islands 2008-05-08

bats - mariana islands biological diversity - marshall islands birds - mariana islands species - marshall islands

Fruit bats of the genus Pteropus are considered to be strong fliers (Kingdon, 1974; Nowak and Paradiso, 1983), with some species commuting distances of 10-50 km between day roosts and feeding areas (Breadon, 1932; Ferrar, 1934; Hall, 1983; Lim,
1966; McWilliam, 1985-1986; Ratcliffe, 1932; Taylor, 1934; Walton and Trowbridge, 1983). Longer seasonal movements of > 100 km are known for several species of Australian Pteropus, which change roosting sites in response to shifting patterns in the
availability of flowers and fruits (Nelson, 1965). However, for most members of the genus, movements remain poorly understood. This is especially true for populations of Pteropus in the Pacific Ocean, many of which are restricted to small islands or small island groups.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 8 Pages

The Takitumu conservation area: a community-owned ecotourism enterprise in the Cook Islands 2008-08-12

conservation area - cook islands environment - cook islands natural resources - conservation - cook islands

The Takitumu Conservation Area was created in 1996 on the island of Rarotonga in the Cook Islands. Its main purpose is to conserve biodiversity for the benefit of present and future gen-
erations. Only local people own the land and its resources. Ecotourism will be the area's main economic activity. A guided nature walk has been organized with landowner agreement and
support.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 4 Pages

Kiribati agroforestry: trees, people and the atoll environment 2008-05-08

environment - conservation - kiribati natural resources - conservation - kiribati natural resources - management - kiribati

Agroforestry, the planting and protection of trees and tree like plants as integral components of a polycultural agricultural system, has always been central to the
economic, cultural and ecological stability of the Kiribati society. This paper focuses on Kiribati agroforestry, and on the role trees play as: 1) integral components of polycultural agricultural systems; 2) symbols of stability and cultural wellbeing; 3) sources of a diverse range of subsistence and commercial products, the imported substitutes for which would be either too expensive or unavailable to most people; and
4) ecologically important components of agricultural systems which, if lost, would lead to irreversible environmental degradation and resultant cultural deterioration. Two
islands of Kiribati, Tarawa and Abemama serve as case studies of Kiribati village- level agroforestry. The findings are based on a ten-day reconnaissance survey of agroforestry on Tarawa and Abemama in 1984, a subsequent visit in early 1989, and
a survey of the available literature.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 30 p.

Soil sedimentation effect on the coastal marine environment, Tefisi Village, Vava'u 2008-08-04

coastal marine environment - vavau

The Tefisi community was concerned of the possible adverse effect of soil being eroded into their coastal environment affecting the marine lives in the areas. In Tefisi, the surface soil is washed away from land development sites, farmland and the settlement areas in every significant rainfall. The fine soil particles flow into the coastal marine environment unchecked, causing the otherwise clear marine environment to become turbid. The outflow of soil not only destroys the ecosystems of the coastal environment, but seriously impacts the local fishery.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 19 p.

Marine Spill Contingency Plan : Papua New Guinea's "National Plan to Combat Pollution of the Sea by Oil and Other Noxious and Hazardous Substances (Draft) 2015-11-20

chemical spill - contingency plan - png - oceania harbours - risk management - png - oceania marine pollution - png - oceania marine resource marine resource management marine resources - pacific - oceania marine resources - papua new guinea marine spill - contingency plan - png - oceania oil spill - contingency plan - png - oceania papua new guinea protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

The Government of Papua New Guinea has developed this National Marine Spill
Contingency Plan (NATPLAN) as part of its commitment to protecting its and our
valuable coastal and marine resources from the threat of marine pollution
incidents.
NATPLAN has been developed to reflect the essential steps necessary to initiate,
conduct and terminate an emergency spill response on, or into the navigable
waters of Papua New Guinea, on the adjoining shorelines, the waters of the
contiguous zone or into waters of the exclusive economic zone.

Online only

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 103p. : ill. (col.) ;

Disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation in the Pacific: the challenge of integration|Appendix E: Integrating participatory disaster risk reduction and climate change adapation to enhance community resilience in the Pacific: case studies from 2010-04-23

climate change - adaptation - oceania disaster - risk reduction - oceania disaster management - oceania environment - protection - samoa risk reduction - oceania

Integrating community based disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA)
is identified at the policy and practical level as crucial to aid effectiveness. Successful integration
reduces both duplication of efforts and confusion at the community level. This research focuses
on Pacific community based DRR and CCA initiatives, and draws upon the knowledge and insight
of key stakeholders from multiple backgrounds to develop an understanding of the current status
of DRR and CCA in the region. Additional understanding is gained through detailed case studies of
current projects in Fiji and Samoa which highlight the challenges and best practice methods used
to integrate DRR and CCA in current community based projects.

Available online|Also available on CD: Contents: Full report. 2. Appendicies A-F. 3. Pacific Insight Newsletters. 4. Conference Paper: Gero et al., 2009

Call Number: 554.12 GER,[EL],CD206

Physical Description: various pagings ; 29 cm

Joint Submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf concerning the Ontong Java Plateau by the Federated States of Micronesia, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands : executive summary - 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of 2010-04-27

sea - convention - oceania sea - law - oceania sea - policy and planning - oceania

The present submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf
('the Commission') is made by the Federated States of Micronesia, Papua New
Guinea and the Solomon Islands (hereinafter referred to collectively as ‘the three
coastal States’) pursuant to paragraph 8 of Article 76 of the 1982 United Nations
Convention on the Law of the Sea ('the Convention') in support of the establishment
by the three coastal States of the outer limits of the continental shelf that lie beyond
200 nautical miles (M) from the baselines from which the breadth of the territorial
sea of the three coastal States is measured (hereinafter referred to as ‘the territorial
sea baselines’) in the Ontong Java Plateau Region.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 41 p.

Aitutaki: climate change community vulnerability and adaptation assessment report 2008-11-17

climate change - aitutaki - cook islands environment - cook islands

Specifically the Community Vulnerability and Adaptation Assessment was conducted to make it possible for the people of Aitutaki to tell the CBDAMPIC project team what climate related
problems Aitutaki may be experiencing, and to gather ideas of how to cope with climate related issues both now (climate variability) and in the future (climate change) at the local level. The CBDAMPIC project is striving to be more than a study, and to actually implement a community identified adaptation option. Therefore this report will serve as a basis for identifying practical and locally appropriate solutions that can be implemented as a pilot adaptation project funded through CIDA. The report also provides a tangible outcome of the community consultations that the Aitutaki people can respond to and explore further.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 75 pg

Brisbane draft Solid waste management strategy: 2003 - 2005 2009-04-01

solid waste management - strategy

Brisbane City Council manages almost half the city's wastes through one of the most efficient and safe waste systems in the world. A state-of- the-art fleet of dedicated waste trucks and waste and recycling single pass trucks can collect both recyclable material and waste from the kerbside. Recyclable material is taken to Materials Recovery Facilities (MRF) for processing. Waste is transported to centrally located transfer stations. From the transfer station the waste is bulk hauled
to fully engineered, double sealed landfills with full gas recovery and leachate treatment.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 24 p.

Biodiversity and livelihoods: REDD benefits 2010-02-10

biodivesity - livelihoods

This brochure demonstrates how measures and policies can be shaped to simultaneously address climate change, biodiversity loss and poverty. It identifies opportunities for synergies and mutual enhancement of the objectives of international agreements, particularly the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), as well as decisions taken by the United Nations (UN) General Assembly following the recommendations of the UN Forum on Forests (UNFF).

Available online|1 copy

Call Number: [EL],333.95 BIO

ISBN/ISSN: 92-9225-337-9

Physical Description: 44 p.

Plants of Kiribati: a listing and analysis of vernacular names 2008-05-08

biological diversity - kiribati fauna - kiribati plants - kiribati

This paper attempts to provide a comprehensive listing and analysis of Kiribati plant names, along with the corresponding Latin, English, and selected Pacific-island vernacular names for plant species with recognized Kiribati vernacular names. The study focuses on those species found on the 16 islands
of the Kiribati group proper (known traditionally as Tungaru), with no attempt being made to include species which might be present on the other islands of Kiribati: Banaba (Ocean Island) to the west and the Line and Phoenix Islands to the east. A brief analysis of relevant past studies and the nature of
the plants and their names is also included. The paper is based on a ten-day in-the-field inventory of Kiribati plant names and plant resources on the islands of Abemama and Tarawa in 1984, plus a four- week field study of the plants of Nauru in 1980-81, which included a study of the plants of the resident
I Kiribati contract worker community. The findings of these studies were then emended in light of comparison and cross-checking with plant lists and plant names from pre-existing sources.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 43 p.

Report on the Small Islands States Capacity Building Workshop on Renewable Energy Technology Applications: Port Vila, Vanuatu 21st - 25th April 2008 2008-05-30

energy - development - oceania sustainable development - oceania

Climate change has been recognized by Pacific Forum Leaders as one of the most serious threats to the region. The Pacific islands have already experienced, and will continue to experience the adverse effects of climate change and these are expected to worsen over the coming decades. For some low lying atoll countries, climate change may even threaten their very existence, as confirmed by the recently published Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, AR4.

Also available online|Also contain Cd-rom

Call Number: 338.9 PAC [EL]

Physical Description: 148 p.

United Nations Development Assistance Framework for the Pacific Subregion 2008-2012 2010-05-05

development - oceania sustainable development - framework - oceania

The UN Development Assistance Framework for the Pacific Subregion (UNDAF) represents the first regionwide response to the UN operational reform process, and is a product of several partnerships in development, including between two UN Country Teams in Fiji and Samoa covering a total of 15 UN agencies, offices and programmes3, and between the UN and the governments of 14 Pacific island countries. While the UNDAF will guide the majority of UN agencies’ work in the Pacific, a minority of activities fall outside of its objectives, due to the unique mandates or ongoing programmes of specific UN agencies. Programmes outside of the UNDAF are listed by agency and country in Section 3.

Available online and also hard copy kept in vertical file collection

Call Number: VF 7068 [EL]

Physical Description: 79 p.

Ecosystems, their properties, goods and services. Climate Change 2007 Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2009-02-23

ecosystems - goods and services ecosystems - properties

During the course of this century the resilience of many
ecosystems (their ability to adapt naturally) is likely to be
exceeded by an unprecedented combination of change in climate, associated disturbances (e.g., flooding, drought, wildfire, insects, ocean acidification) and in other global change drivers (especially land-use change, pollution and over-exploitation of resources), If greenhouse gas emissions and other changes continue at or above current rates (high confidence).

Available online|(* NB these materials are also available on the workshop CDROM deposited with the IRC – NBSAP workshop Nadi, Feb 2009)

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 62 p.

Biodiversity in EIA and SEA : background document to CBD decision VIII/28: voluntary guidelines on biodiversity-inclusive impact assessment 2009-02-23

biodiversity - impact assessment biological diversity - impact assessment

The CBD, the Ramsar Convention and the CMS recognise impact assessment as an important tool to ensure that development is planned and implemented with biodiversity 'in mind'. The CBD requires parties to apply impact assessment to projects, programmes, plans and policies with a potential negative impact on biodiversity. Considerable progress has been made in strengthening impact assessment as a tool to further the aims of the CBD and related conventions. However, practise shows
that more work is needed.

Available online|(* NB these materials are also available on the workshop CDROM deposited with the IRC – NBSAP workshop Nadi, Feb 2009)

Call Number: [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-90-421-1811-9

Physical Description: 81 p.

Towards integrated National Ocean Policy in the South Pacific: competing and conflicting issues in Ocean Policy: Solomon Islands 2008-05-16

marine environment - policy - oceania national ocean policy - oceania ocean - law and legislation - oceania

It has been over twenty years since UNCLOS came into existence and twelve years since it came into force, in addition to fourteen years since the historic "Earth Summit" was convened in Rio de Janeiro in Brazil, yet the Pacific Small Island Developing States (SIDS) are finding it extremely difficult to deal with many cross-cutting and multiple issues relating to ocean management. The challenge for the Pacific SIDS is clear, successive international, regional and national initiatives
emphasizing sustainable environmental development and ocean management have no real impact at the rural communities' level. This paper examines the challenges facing Solomon Islands in the
development of an Integrated National Ocean Policy, and offer recommendation guidelines as to how to design an Integrated National Ocean Framework so as to contribute to the effort to ensure that all benefits derived from the oceans are sustainable and reach through to the local communities.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 171 p.

Effects of turbidity on shallow-water reef fish assemblages in Truk, Eastern Caroline islands 2008-08-06

reef fish - effects turbidity - eastern caroline islands

Reef fish assemblages were monitored annually from 1978 to 1981 at a series of stations adjacent to an airport runway construction site on Moen, Truk. Monitoring began prior to construction activities and continued through three years during which dredging and filling of adjacent reef areas took place. As a result of construction activities, large amounts of sediments were released into the water. Turbidity was measured monthly
throughout the period of the fish monitoring and showed considerable variation from station to station. Fish abundance and diversity were significantly reduced at stations which were inundated with fine sediments. However, at stations at which sediment did not accumulate, fish assemblages remained reasonably stable, even under conditions of high water turbidity. The value of using reef fish as indicators of early stages of environmental degradation is discussed.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 5 Pages

The natural history of Namoluk atoll, eastern Caroline islands : with identification of vascular flora 2008-05-15

ecology - conservation - caroline islands - federated states of micronesia history - caroline islands - federated states of micronesia vegetation - conservation - caroline islands - federated state of micronesia

As of 1969, the scientific community had no general information on the natural history of Namoluk Atoll in the Eastern Caroline Islands of Micronesia. The only significant published source for the atoll was an ethnographic and linguistic account provided by the German physician.
Max Girschner (1912, 1913), that contained a few brief passages on the biology and physical environment of the atoll. With this lack of basic descriptive environmental information in mind, I resolved to make observations and collections of specimens of use to other atoll scholars ancillary to an anthropological research project which I undertook on Namoluk from 1969-1971.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 69 p.

The economic impact of a proposed Mariana trench marine national monument: an exploratory study 2008-08-08

environmental impact assessment - mariana

Most of the 96 national monuments designated under U.S. law
are on land. The majority are managed by the National Park
Service, though some are administered by the Bureau of Land
Management and other agencies. At this point neither the
name of the proposed Mariana Trench Marine National Monu-
ment (MTMNM) nor the management structure has been de-
termined. For guidance one could review the process of the
recently designated Papahanaumokuakea Marine National
Monument (PMNM), which is placed within the purview of the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
for budgetary purposes.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 29 p.

An act of levy deposits in respect of the recovery of waste materials in Kiribati; and for connected purposes 2009-04-01

waste - law and regulations - kiribati waste - regulations - kiribati

The Minister responsible for environment acting in accordance with the advice of the Cabinet may, subject to the provisions of this Act, levy Deposits in respect of prescribed materials for waste material recovery.
Deposits levied under subsection (1) of this section shall be laid before the Maneaba ni Maungatabu within forty-eight hours of the day on which the next meeting of the Maneaba commences and shall come into operation on publication unless the Maneaba by resolution amends it or rejects it as the case may be.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 6 Pages

Cuvu waste management workshop report, Cuvu village, 13-14 September 2005 2008-08-07

waste management - fiji islands waste minimisation - fiji islands

The Cuvu Waste Management Workshop was held from the 13th - 14th of September, 2005 in the village of Cuvu. Paticipants included representatives from the seven villages. In the Tikina of Cuvu and a few from Tikina Wai. The purpose of the workshop was to
enhance the capacity of local communities in the Tikina to better manage their own waste. The workshop was planned and coordinated by the Peace Corps Volunteers in the Coral Coast Area with support from the Nadroga/Navosa Provincial Office and the Institute of Applied Science (IAS). This initiative is part of the Integrated Coastal Management Project which is hosted by IAS. The workshop was conducted in response to a request from Cuvu Tikina.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 30 p.

Tusi Taiala mo le Pulea Tatau ma le Va'aia Lelei o I'a ma Figota o le Afioaga o Vaisala 2015-11-25

fisheries - samoa - savaii - vaisala fishery management - samoa - savaii - vaisala fishery policy - samoa - savaii - vaisala

Fishing in Samoa is very important because one of the ways to achieve food security, particularly in
communities and villages in rural areas. In many communities, they do not appreciate the vision of the economy
and the marine environment. Bringing the use of such fishing a modern-day, there
What meanava, nets and hurry microfilm, and substances that would easily and more fish, but
are harmful to the marine environment and ecosystems. The implementation of projects in the
marine damage to many places and millions of species of living and breeding.
To save the situation, established by the Fisheries Department of the Ministry of Agriculture
Fisheries program for the Management of Environmental Hazard and Spy Good Fish
and seafood, to help build a Jurisdiction fishing villages and communities to preserve,
control and rationalizing the use of the economies of the coastal country.

Online|Samoan

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 9p. : ill. (col.) ;

Small Islands [in] Climate change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2009-02-23

climate change - adaptation - small islands climate change - impacts - small islands climate change - vulnerability - small islands intergovernmental panel on climate change ipcc

While acknowledging their diversity, the IPCC Third
Assessment Report (TAR) also noted that small island states
share many similarities (e.g., physical size, proneness to natural disasters and climate extremes, extreme openness of their economies, low adaptive capacity) that enhance their vulnerability and reduce their resilience to climate variability and change.

Available online|(* NB these materials are also available on the workshop CDROM deposited with the IRC – NBSAP workshop Nadi, Feb 2009)

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 30 p.

Handbook of the Convention on Biological Diversity Including its Cartegena Protocol on Biosafety 2008-05-01

biological diversity - law - handbook biological diversity - legislation - handbook environment - convention - handbook

This Handbook is intended as a reference guide to decisions adopted by the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Conference of the Parties to the Convention serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (COP-MOP) as well as a guide to ongoing activities in relation to particular Articles and/or cross-cutting issues of the Convention. The structure of the Handbook has been conceived with a view to allowing frequent updates, so as to take into account new decisions of the Con-
ference of the Parties.

Available online

Call Number: 341.762 SEC [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 92-9225-011-6

Physical Description: 1533 p.

Flora of Maupiti, Society islands 2008-05-08

biological diversity - society islands flora - society islands

This report includes an introductory section on the geography and vegetation, and a main portion listing the species of vascular plants known to occur, or to have occurred, on the island, with detailed descriptions of those of which time permitted a careful study, and brief descriptions of the remaining native species. Those suspected to have been brought by Polynesians in pre-European time are also described and discussed in some detail. Exotic species are either very briefly described or, especially in cases of very familiar weeds and ornamentals, merely listed with remarks on their occurrences and
citations of specimens. Collections by Raynal are cited, as are those made on the 1985 expedition, with symbols indicating the herbaria where they are deposited. The Raynal specimens are in the herbarium of the Laboratoire de Phanerogamie Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris (P).

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 71 p.

Suwarrow seabird survey : an assessment of the numbers and age-stages of seabird chicks on the motus of Suwarrow atoll during July 2008 2008-11-17

no keyword provided

Each Suwarrow motu was surveyed during July 2008 for seabird chick numbers and age-states using a simple sampling method used for a similar survey in August 2000. Totals for each species are presented in the Table below and detailed data for each motu can be found in the Results section. Overall, bird numbers appear to be similar or slightly lower than those recorded in 2000.It is not clear if the lower numbers reported represent any real shift from natural variation due to such factors as storm damage to breeding sites, however it is noted that when compared with earlier survey results (1972-1992) numbers of Sooty Tern, Red-taileded Tropicbird and Brown Booby have tended to trend downwards.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 19 p.

Abundance of commercially important species of invertebrates, fish and the status of coral health in community based marine protected areas in Gela, Central Province, Solomon Islands 2008-08-04

marine protected areas - solomon islands marine resource marine resource management marine resources - pacific - oceania marine resources - solomon islands protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania solomon islands

The sites at Sandfly in Gela, Central Province were established over a three year period (three sites in 2004, two sites in 2005 and one site in 2007) after a series of workshops on good governance and marine resource awareness raising under the coral gardens project which was implemented by SIDT, ECANSI and Fisheries Division of the Solomon Islands government with funding from SPREP through FSPI. The sites are all community owned although two of them are owned and operated by resort owners who are indigenous residents of Gela

Available online

Call Number: 25389

Physical Description: 28 p.

Pacific Organic Standard : 2008 : the Pacific Organic story 2008-08-12

organic produce - standard - oceania

The Pacific Islands region is characterised by island nations with small populations scattered across an ocean area of approximately 36 million square kilometres. Less than 2 percent of this area is land. The region has a total population of around 8.5 million people.
The 22 countries and territories of the Pacific include a mixture of continental islands, volcanic islands and low and raised coral atolls. These countries and territories have
traditionally been divided into three groups - Melanesia (west), Polynesia (southeast) and Micronesia (north).

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 48 p.

Report of the Fourth (4th) Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Waigani Convention, 5th September 2008, Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia 2009-01-27

environmental policy - oceania - congresses hazardous wastes - law and legislation - oceania - congresses waigani convention -

The fourth Conference of the Parties to the Convention to Ban the Importation into Forum Island Countries of Hazardous and Radioactive Wastes and to Control the Transboundary Movement and the Management of Hazardous Wastes within the South Pacific Region (Waigani Convention) was held on 5 September 2008 in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia.

4 copies|Available online

Call Number: 344.04622 SEC [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-982-04-0387-1

Physical Description: 52 p. ; 29 cm

Reviewing weather and climate services in the Pacific 2010-04-23

climate change - services - oceania climatic changes - review - oceania weather - services - oceania

A team of consultants conducted a review of Pacific Regional Meteorological Services as commissioned by the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) in November 2009. This was in response to a directive from Pacific Islands Forum Leaders. Over the period November 2009-April 2010, the team reviewed relevant documentation, consulted with SPREP member countries and other organisations, and considered feedback on a draft report before presenting its final report and recommendations.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 155 p.

Environmental Impact Assessment guidelines: Solomon Islands 2010-05-05

Land environmental impact assessment - solomon islands environmental monitoring - solomon islands

Most of the development activities that generate foreign earnings for the economy of Solomon Islands are heavily dependent upon the exploitation and utilization of natural resources. For many years, economic development activities in Solomon Islands have not integrated environmental considerations. As a result of its accelerated pace of development and level of exploitation of its natural resources, the country witnesses significant natural resources depletion resulting in environmental pollution, degradation and damage.Thus, it is crucial that there is proper legal mechanism in place that governs the proper and responsible management of the natural resources and the environment in general by means of controlling and regulating development activities.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 29 p.

Mauke power sector feasibility report : 2004 2008-08-12

environment - cook islands renewable energy - feasibility study - cook islands

This report has investigated the current power system on Mauke and the local renewable energy (RE) options available to supplement in the short to medium term and replace in the
long term the current diesel generation. In the short term refurbishment of the present diesel based system is required to ensure provision of reliable supply and minimise environmental degradation through fuel handling practises. Staff training and service equipment should be provided. Initiation of a wind
monitoring programme will substantiate the available wind resource whilst investigations into the biomass will evaluate medium to long term potential.

Available online|Prepared as part of the UNDP/UNESCO technical assistance project "Increase the utilisation of renewable energy technologies in the Cook Islands Energy supply"

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 90 p.

Assessment of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) watching activities in Vava'u, Tonga : pilot study 2009-01-30

pilot study

Whale-watching has recently developed into an important industry within the South Pacific islands region (Economists @ Large & Associates. 2008a). In particular, the presence of humpback whales at high latitudes during the winter months has become of great interest over the last 10 years (Schaffar and Garrigue. 2007). In the Kingdom of Tonga, whale-watching activities began in 1994 and focus on a small population of humpback whales utilising the waters around Vava'u as their
main breeding ground between the months of July and October. The whale-watching industry in Tonga is unique as it is one of the only countries worldwide to actively promote swimming with humpback whales.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 23 p.

Information and common questions on marine debris 2008-08-14

marine debris - information

It is becoming clear that there is a fair amount of small plastic distributed in the oceans and on beaches worldwide, not surprising given its durability and floatability. Marine debris is often ingested by animals such as sea turtles, marine mammals, and seabirds. Items such as lighters and small plastic pieces may look like food to an animal, or have an animal's natural food attached to it. Debris may also be ingested accidentally with actual food items. Exactly how many of them die each year due to marine debris ingestion is not
known.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 5 Pages

Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in Pacific Island Countries, Phase II - scheduled POPs and intractable pesticide disposal : Project Design Document 2008-04-30

persistent organic pollutants pesticide disposal

This disposal project is the second stage (Phase II) of an AusAID-fiuided project developed in conjunction with South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) to manage persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Pacific Island Countries (PICs). The Phase I project, which was implemented between April 1997 and April 2000. involved an inventory of hazardous chemicals, and a discussion of management options for obsolete chemicals and containers, in the PICs. Although many obsolete agricultural and other chemicals can be disposed of safely locally, others cannot.

Available online|POPs in PICs Phase II - POPs Disposal

Call Number: EL

Physical Description: 75 p.

Coastal zone management and conservation in the South Pacific 2008-08-08

coastal zone - management - conservation - oceania

Most marine coastal conservation efforts have been species - focused and sea turles have received special attention, efforts having been made to boost depleted populations by protecting nesting beaches and hatchlings.For all the dedication,time and money applied to turtle conservation projects their effectiveness in the South Pacific region remains
uncertain. Apart from the ecological questions which arise there is one very important lesson to be learned from these efforts - that, without a firm commitment and involvement of all affected local communities such projects must eventually fail.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 17 p.

Community marine conservation area, the Arnavon islands, Solomon islands : project preparation document (PPD) 2009-02-23

marine conservation area - solomon islands protected areas - management protected areas - oceania - pacific

In 1981, the Isabel provincial government first recognized the importance of the Arnavon Islands as a nesting ground for Hawksbill turtles, and designated the islands as a Wildlife
Sanctuary. At that time, however, the government did not adequately recognize the local communities' rights and the project failed. In 1989, the South Pacific Regional Environment
Programme (SPREP) collaborated with the Solomon Islands government and the Ministry of Natural Resources (now the Ministry of Forestry, Environment and Conservation or MFEC) to
survey the Hawksbill turtle nesting beaches and populations in the northern Solomon Islands including the Amavons. The surveys documented the severe depletion of the Hawksbill turtle
population due to the turtle shell (bekko) export trade which has flourished in recent years. As a result of the surveys interest was renewed for conservation in the area and local communities were approached for their support in establishing a conservation area. Through its close association with
SPREP and MFEC, The Nature Conservancy (TNC) was invited by the government to take a leading role in developing and implementing a marine conservation area project to protect turtle nesting beaches and other important marine and island species on the Arnavon Islands.

2 copies|Available online

Call Number: 333.9516 SOU,VF 5580,[EL]

Physical Description: various pagings

Regional wetlands action plan for the Pacific Islands 2011-2013 2011-03-07

wetlands conservation - oceania

The Regional Wetlands Action Plan (RWAP) for the Pacific Islands (SPREP, 1999) was endorsed by the 26 member countries and territories of SPREP. The Action Plan contained 28 priority actions in the areas of management, capacity building, research and monitoring for wetland ecosystems. In 2002, a formal memorandum of cooperation was signed between the Secretariat of the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands and SPREP to promote the importance of wetland conservation in the Pacific Islands region. This partnership has continued with the third memorandum of cooperation recently signed between the two organizations in 2009.

Available online

Call Number: 333.918 SEC [EL]

Physical Description: 18 p.

Model Shipping (Ballast Water Management) Regulations 2015-11-20

ballast water - management - oceania marine pollution - shipping - regulations model shipping - oceania

This draft model law has been designed specifically for countries which have already enacted
comprehensive marine pollution legislation, and in particular the model Marine Pollution
Prevention Act prepared by SPC and SPREP, and last revised in 2002. For countries that have not
enacted marine pollution legislation of that nature, it is recommended that instead of using this
draft model law, consideration be given to enacting comprehensive marine pollution legislation
based upon the recently revised Act, which now includes ballast water provisions consistent with
the Ballast Water Management Convention. Those new provisions are similar to the provisions of
these model draft Regulations.

Online only

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 17p. : ill. (non. col.) ;

Determining thermal stress using indices: sea surface temperature 2008-08-05

no keyword provided

Sea temperatures in many tropical regions have increased by almost 1°C over the past 100 years and are currently increasing at 1 ~ 2°C per century. Satellite and compiled in situ observations of sea surface temperatures have greatly increased the ability to detect anomalous and persistent warm water and are being widely used to predict climate change, coral bleaching and mortality.
In my study I attempted to measure in situ sea surface temperature using vemco water prob loggers. I used three indices: sea surface anomalies, degree heating days and heating rate to determine thermal stress on a reef flat. I identified the indices sea surface temperature anomalies provide significant data to determine heating is accruing on a reef and just mean monthly temperature data of a reef is not sufficient
enough to indicate that the reef is heating and result in bleaching. Accumulated heat stress represented by exposure time and temperature (DHD) allows for-casting of bleaching severity. The cumulative thermal stress graph in my study indicates that after 120 degree heating days the thermal stress kep increasing on the reef for at least 3 more weeks m cooler month hence its vital to note temperature even after summer months.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 6 Pages

Biogeography of reptiles on some of the Islands and Cays of Eastern Papua New Guinea 2008-05-21

cays - biogeography - papua new guinea reptiles - biogeography - papua new guinea

During participation in part of the Fairbridge Expedition
to New Guinea, February to May, 1969, I had opportunity to visit 17 islands and cays east of the New Guinea mainland for sufficient time to assemble reasonably complete collections oi their terrestrial reptilian fauna. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of that survey. Fairbridge (1971 ) has previously published a brief report on the expedition and. a more detailed one is in preparation.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 41 p.

Establishing marine protected area networks: making it happen 2008-11-20

marine resource marine resource management marine resources - pacific - oceania protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

Healthy marine resources require healthy, intact ecosystems. Marine and coastal ecosystems are highly productive and deliver various goods and services that support communities and economies, including food security, clean water, recreational
opportunities and other benefits. Effective area-based protection, through MPAs, helps maintain ecosystem health and productivity, while safeguarding social and economic
development. They also help maintain the full range of genetic variation, essential in securing viable populations of key species, sustaining evolutionary processes and ensuring resilience in the face of natural disturbances and human use (Agardy and Staub 2006).

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-2-8317-1090-7

Physical Description: 128 p.

Funafuti atoll coral reef restoration project (Republic of Tuvalu) : baseline report 2008-08-05

coral reef - management - tuvalu coral reef - restoration - tuvalu

FSPI CCP program has recognized the need of applied research and capacity building to support community based activities. FSPI has been researching the development of low-tech coral reef restoration techniques as a viable management tool for local communities. FSPI, through its affiliates, PCDF and Solomon Island Development Trust, have conducted coral reef restoration
trials in conjunction with the Darwin initiative project. The FSPI approach aims to be community based, low- tech, cost and management effective with a strong focus on active interest from communities and participation in awareness raising processes.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 42 p.

Land for life: securing our common future 2011-11-08

land - conservation land - protection protection of natural resources

The GEF and UNCCD Secretariats collaborated on this new book to convey how sustainable land management (SLM) practices are helping shape a sustainable future for people and the planet. The book is illustrated with high quality photos donated by the GoodPlanet Foundation and from other sources, to demonstrate how human ingenuity is largely driving innovations in soil, land, water, and vegetation management. It describes how harnessing natural, social, and cultural capital is addressing fundamental needs for livelihood and well-being—food, water, energy, and wealth—while delivering global environmental benefits.

1 copy and also available online

Call Number: 333.72 GLO

Physical Description: 194 p. : col. ; illus. ; 25 cm

Green customs guide to Multilateral Environmental Agreements 2009-03-24

multilateral environmental - agreements

Multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) are agreements
between several parties—that is, States or, in some cases, regional economic integration organisations such as the European Union—to pursue specific measures aimed at protecting the environment and conserving natural resources. This type of initiative is often brought about by worldwide concerns about the great and sometimes serious impacts of seemingly harmless human activities on the Earth's fragile environment. In response to these impacts, nations are now questioning the long-term sustainability of such activities in view of the need to ensure a safe future for coming generations.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-92-807-2845-3

Physical Description: 124 p

Status of coral reefs in Polynesia Mana node countries: Cook Islands, French Polynesia, Niue, Kiribati, Tonga, Tokelau and Wallis and Futuna 2009-02-05

coral reefs - conservation - oceania coral reefs - monitoring - oceania environment - cook islands

Status of coral reefs in the Polynesia Mana node is predominantly healthy. There are 6733 km2 of reefs scattered over 347 islands. Most (90%) are healthy, 5% have been destroyed or are at a critical stage and 5% are under threat;Reefs have been degraded around populated areas of Rarotonga (Cook Islands), Tahiti and Moorea (French Polynesia) and South Tarawa (Kiribati);Coral reefs support the livelihoods of Polynesian populations through subsistence fishing in all countries and through tourism and black pearl industries in French
Polynesia and the Cook Islands; The main threats to the reefs are global warming for the remote reefs and land- based pollution for reefs near urban areas. Dynamite fishing still occurs in Wallis and Futuna;Reefs are mostly healthy in Wallis and Futuna, Tuamotu-Gambier and the Marquesas Archipelagos of French Polynesia; Reefs have largely recovered from past bleaching events in Phoenix Islands and Tarawa in Kiribati, and reefs are recovering from crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS)
outbreaks in Rarotonga (Cook Islands) and from a cyclone in Niue; Reefs are facing a major COTS outbreak in the Society Archipelago of French Polynesia; and Socioeconomic assessments are now being implemented in the region, in parallel
with ecological monitoring, to support coral reef management.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 10 Pages

A proposal for the establishment of a national meteorological and hydrological service : a report prepared for the Government of the Republic of Nauru 2008-08-14

climate change - services - nauru meteorological services - nauru

This report has been prepared at the request of the Government of Nauru to provide advice and instruction for the establishment of a National Meteorological and Hydrological Service (NMHS) in this country.
A National Meteorological and Hydrological Service is to be established in Nauru to provide scientific and technical advice to the government and people of Nauru. Nauru is the only independent country or self-governing territory within the membership of the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) not to have an established NMHS.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 27 p.

Checklist of the shorefishes of Ouvea atoll, New Caledonia 2008-05-07

Coastal and Marine marine resource marine resource management marine resources - conservation - new caledonia marine resources - new caledonia marine resources - pacific - oceania natural resources - management - new caledonia new caledonia protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania shorefishes - conservation - new caledonia

The shorefishes of Ouvea, an isolated atoll in the Loyalty Islands group of New Caledonia, had not been surveyed prior to 1990. An extensive survey was conducted by ORSTOM between 1991 and 1992 to obtain baseline information on the shorefishes. A
total of 653 taxa among 72 families are now documented from this area. The most diverse families are the Labridae (69 species), Pomacentridae (58 species), Gobiidae (54 spccies),Serranidae (39 species), Chaetodontidae (31 species) and Apogonidae (28
species). The absence or very low diversity of some families (Clupeidae, Nemipteridae, Siganidae) or genera (Abudefduf, Neopomacentrus) is similar to findings for other isolated islands of the Coral Sea. Of the 653 species recorded from Ouvea, 51 species have not been reported from New Caledonia, a large high island to the South. Only one endemic species, Luzonichthys williamsi, has been recognized among the shorefishes at Ouvea. A number of Pacific Plate endemic species were recorded at Ouvea. which is positioned on the Australasian Plate to the south of the edge of the Pacific Plate.
Antennarius duescus, previously known from three specimens taken at the Hawaiian Islands, is recorded from a single specimen taken at Ouvea. Another antitropical distribution pattern is exhibited by Dinemalichthys riukiuensis, which is known to occur
at Fiji, Ouvea and Queensland in the South and from Okinawa.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 28 p.

Notes on the vascular flora and terrestrial vertebrates of Caroline atoll Southern Line Islands 2008-06-05

flora - fauna - caroline atoll

From 0900 on 17 June to 0615 on 19 June 1965 Caroline Atoll was visited by a field party from the Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program (POBSP) of the Smithsonian Institution. The field party, led by Sibley, collected and made observations on vascular plants, fish, reptiles, mammals, and birds. All islands with the exception of the northern two-thirds of Nake were visited. Prior knowledge of the biota of Caroline Atoll is very scant, deriving almost entirely from the visits of F. D. Bennett in 1835, Devoy in 1875, and the U.S.S. Hartford in 1883. This paper summarizes earlier data and presents recent POBSP observations on the flora and terrestrial vertebrates, identifying many of them for the first time

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 20 p.

Village-based marine resources use and rural livelihoods: Kimbe Bay, West New Britain, Papua New Guinea 2008-06-18

environment - protection - papua new guinea marine resource marine resource management marine resources - conservation - papua new guinea marine resources - pacific - oceania natural resources - conservation - papua new guinea papua new guinea protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

This socio-economic study was conducted in six villages in Kimbe Bay and was part of a larger project being undertaken by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to understand the physical and biological aspects of marine ecosystems of Kimbe Bay and the socioeconomic issues influencing local marine resource use and conservation. The Kimbe Bay project aims to protect and conserve the biodiversity and marine resources of the marine environment from the pressures of population increase and economic development within the Bay.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 129 p.

Economic valuation and socioeconomics of coral reefs: methodological issues and three case studies 2008-05-23

coral reefs - economic valuation coral reefs - management coral reefs - socioeconomics economic valuation marine resource marine resource management marine resources - conservation and management marine resources - pacific - oceania protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

In most tropical countries, coral reef ecosystems provide coastal populations with a number of goods and services. However, a variety of anthropogenic practices threatens reef health and therefore jeopardizes the benefits flowing from these goods and services. These threats range from local pollution, sedimentation, destructive fishing practices and coral mining, to global issues such as coral bleaching.
By “getting some of the numbers on the table”, economic valuation can help shed light on the importance of the goods and services and show the costs of inaction in the face of threats. Creating markets for sustainable resource use can highlight the value of these goods and services to local populations

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 27 p.

Economics and the Convention on Biological Diversity 2008-05-23

convention - economics - biological diversity

The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is one of the global conventions on environmental conservation that came out of the 1992 UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. By signing and ratifying the CBD, countries have agreed to support its goals and aims. The three main objectives of the CBD are the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components, and the fair
and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilisation of genetic resources. To achieve these objectives, the CBD includes 42 articles, each dealing with specific aspects of biodiversity conservation, sustainable use and equitable
benefit sharing.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 4 Pages

Plants of Satawal Island, Caroline Islands 2008-06-05

plants - conservation - caroline islands

Satawal is a small flat coral island in the west central Caroline Islands about 1050 km east-south-east of Yap Island, at latitude 7'21' N, longitude 147'02' E. Although its surface is locally somewhat irregular, its greatest height is not more than about 4 meters above mean low water. Its long axis is about east-west and its area is 1.3 square km. It is surrounded by a fringing reef upward of 100 meters wide. It has no lagoon, so would be classified according to Tayama's scheme as a table reef. From the viewpoint of land ecology it is an atoll. The substratum varies from sandy to boulders, with some peat very locally. The beaches are sandy around the western half, of pebbles and cobbles around the eastern half.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 14 p.

Tusi Taiala mo le Pulea Tatau ma le Va'aia Lelei o I'a ma Figota o le Afioaga o Lepuia'i Manono-Tai 2015-11-25

fisheries - samoa - lepuia'i manono-tai fishery management - samoa - lepuia'i manono-tai fishery policy - samoa - lepuia'i manono-tai

Fishing in Samoa is very important because one of the ways to achieve food security, particularly in
villages and rural areas. In many communities do not value taking care of the economy
and the marine environment. Making and using such fisheries jurisdiction for-or-not there
mask, nets and hurry microfilm, and substances that would easily and more fish but
are detrimental to the marine environment and ecosystems. The implementation of projects on
marine damage in many places and millions of species of marine wildlife.

Online|Samoan

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 13p. : ill. (col.) ;

Climate change policies in the Asia-Pacific: re-uniting climate change and sustainable development 2008-07-25

climate change - policies - oceania climate change - sustainable development - oceania

Climate change is real and Asia is already experiencing its adverse impacts. Projections from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) suggest that such impacts will become even more intense in the future. While the contribution of developing countries in Asia to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is increasing rapidly, per capita emissions are still low and developmental challenges remain significant. Future efforts by developed countries to reduce GHG emissions through cost-effective mitigation actions, however, offer the possibility of creating new opportunities in developing countries in Asia that will contribute to their sustainable development. Strategies to integrate climate and development actions, therefore, require prompt and careful consideration from policymakers in Asia. Part I of the White Paper explains why it is necessary to integrate climate change and sustainable development in Asia and how this might be best achieved

Call Number: 551.6 CLI [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-4-88788-048-1

Physical Description: 312 p. ; 29 cm

CRISP Coordination unit: consolidated report of the programme, 2nd semester 2008-08-06

coral reef - management - oceania

The monitoring and evaluation system of CRISP programme is semester based with 2 reports describing activities from the 1st of January to the 30th of June and the 1st of July to the 31st of December respectively. Actions occurring on the field are classified according to the type of activities, which are explained according to projects comprised into different compo-
nents. Components are sub-divided into projects that are under the responsibility of supervisors and managers respectively. The pyramid-shaped programme of monitoring and evaluation plans to summarize activities put in place over each semester. In the first place, reports are submitted to the managers of each project then feedbacks are given to the supervisors of each component for submission and compilation by CRISP Coordination Unit (CCU) at the end of each semester. Each of these 2 stages take approximately one month and consolidating the reports take 2 months after the following deadlines, either September of the same year for the first semester or March of the year N+1 for
the second semester. The translation of the consolidated report postpones the issue of English version by few weeks.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 25 p.

Wetlands of the Pacific island region 2008-07-25

coral reef - oceania freshwater swamp - oceania mangrove - oceania seagrass - oceania wetlands - conservation - oceania wetlands - management - oceania

The wetlands of 21 countries and territories of the Pacific Islands region are reviewed: American Samoa, Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, French Polynesia, Guam, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Caledonia, Niue, Northern Mariana Islands, Palau, Papua New Guinea,Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, and Wallis and Futuna. The regions’ wetlands are classified into seven systems coral reefs, seagrass beds, mangrove swamps, riverine, lacustrine, freshwater swamp forests and marshes. The diversity of species in each of these groups is at near global maxima at the west of the region, with decline towards the east with increasing isolation, and decreasing island size and age. The community structure is unique in each country, and many have endemic species with the habitat isolation that epitomises this island region. There remain, however, some serious gaps in basic inventory, particularly in freshwater biodiversity.Threats to wetlands include introduced freshwater species, loss of wetlands adjacent to urban growth, downstream effects of mining and land clearance, and over-use of mangrove, seagrass and coral reef resources by predominant subsistence economies that remain in this region. Only five countries are signatories to the Ramsar convention on wetlands, and this only recently with seven sites. Wetland managers have identified the need for community education, baseline surveys and monitoring, better legislation and policy for wetland management, and improved capacity of local communities to allow the wise use of their wetlands.

Available online|article published in Wetlands Ecol Manage

Call Number: VF 6991 [EL]

Physical Description: 38 p.

Managing seagrasses for Resilience to Climate Change 2009-07-21

seagrasses - resilience - climate change

There is growing evidence that seagrasses are experiencing declines globally due to anthropogenic threats (Short and Wyllie Echeverria 1996, Duarte 2002, Orth et al. 2006). Runoff of nutrients and sediments that affect water quality is the greatest anthropogenic threat to seagrass meadows, although other stressors include aquaculture, pollution, boating, construction, dredging and landfill activities, and destructive fishing practices. Natural disturbances such as storms and floods can also cause adverse effects. Potential threats from climate change include rising sea levels, changing tidal regimes, UV radiation damage, sediment hypoxia and anoxia, increases in sea temperatures and increased storm and flooding events. Thus, seagrass meadows, the ecosystems that they support and the ecosystem services that they provide are threatened by a multitude of environmental factors that are currently changing or will change in the future.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-2-8317-1089-1

Physical Description: 60 p. ; 29 cm

Strategic Action Programme (SAP) of the Pacific Small Island Developing States : project document 2009-04-15

conservation of natural resources - oceania environmental management - oceania

  1. A defining feature of the Pacific is the Western Pacific Warm Pool ecosystem. The limited land base of the area is distributed among 200 high islands and 2,500 low islands and atolls. All
    participating islands lie in the tropical zone and experience sea surface temperatures that rarely fall below 20 degrees Celsius. In general, the islands increase in size from east to west such that over 83% of the region's land mass is situated in Papua New Guinea, and most of the rest is in the other Melanesian countries and territories.

    Available online

    Call Number: [EL]

    Physical Description: 96 p.

The earthquake and tsunami of 1865 November 17: evidence for far-field tsunami hazard from Tonga 2008-08-06

environmental hazards - effects - tonga

Historical reports of an earthquake in Tonga in 1865 November identify it as the only event from that subduction zone which generated a far-field tsunami observable without instruments.
Run-up heights reached 2 m in Rarotonga and 80 cm in the Marquesas Islands. Hydrodynamic simulations require a moment of 4 x 1028 dyn cm, a value significantly larger than previous
estimates of the maximum size of earthquake to be expected at the Tonga subduction zone. This warrants an upwards re evaluation of the tsunami risk from Tonga to the Cook Islands
and the various Polynesian chains, which had hitherto been regarded as minor.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 11 Pages

Pacific Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) Project: End-of-contract report on Regional programme for implementation of the Montreal protocol in the Pacific Region October 2002 - October 2005 2008-11-17

no keyword provided

This report describes the background, progress and status of activities under the accountability of SPREP's Assistant Project Officer. Ozone Depleting Substances (APO ODS) during the three-year contract at SPREP. It is intended as an overview primarily for SPREP Management, the new APO ODS and SPREP programme staff. This report may also be used by Pacific Island Countries (PICs).
executing agency (UNEP) and donors (Montreal Protocol's Multilateral Fund and Australia) on the status of the Project at SPREP.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 15 p.

American Samoa: local action strategy 2009-04-14

environment - protection - samoa natural resources - protection - american samoa protected areas - american samoa protected areas - management

The American Samoa Local Action Strategies (LAS) are the result of a nearly two-year process that saw input from territorial agencies, non-profit groups, interested individuals, and other stake-holders such as local fishers, and federal agency partners. This process was initiated through the American
Samoa Coral Reef Advisory Group (CRAG), a voluntary committee comprised of numerous agencies and academic institutions in the territory concerned with coral reef issues. Since its inception in 1998, CRAG has overseen many successful management and science activities, has increased member-agency collaboration
and has improved alignment and cooperation with non-CRAG agencies that have common interests. To address LAS focus areas, CRAG developed both short- and long-term action plans that prioritize activities for funding. Where possible, current and ongoing activities were incorporated into each LAS to provide
continuity and networking, and to underscore that individual agency mandates and projects are supported by the CRAG as a whole. Each LAS consists of goals, success indicators, projects and timelines, and will continue to evolve and develop as new resources are brought to bear, and as projects are completed.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 2 Pages

A bibliography of plant conservation in the Pacific Islands: endangered species, habitat conversion, introduced biota 2008-05-08

biological diversity - oceania endangered species - oceania habitat conversion - oceania plant conservation - oceania

Several large regions of the world are plagued by
conservation problems shaped around a particular inherent
set of geographical, biological and human conditions which
have been operational for varying periods of time. Typical
of situations facing Latin America are the progress of
economic development in Amazonia with its attendant loss of
rainforest biodiversity, and the Central American
"hamburger connection" involving conversion of forests to
grazing land to support the export of cheap beef to the
United States. Characteristic of Africa is the struggle
with desertification in the Sahel and the terminally
desperate fuelwood crisis there. Europe has its centuries-
long history of urbanization and the deforestation of
Mediterranean lands to contend with, while the similarly
industrialized North American continent must deal with
large-scale wetland drainage, the effects of high-
technology terrain vehicles (swamp buggies, dune buggies,
snowmobiles, motorcycles) on the landscape, as well as
protecting the endangered cacti indigenous to the deserts
from overexploitative commerce.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 197 p.

Notes on the verterbrate fauna of Tongareva atoll 2008-05-15

Biodiversity animals -tongareva atoll - cook islands environment - cook islands fauna - tongareva atoll - cook islands

At the time of the POBSP visit, cats (Felis domestica), dogs
(Canis familiaris), and pigs (Sus scrofa) were being raised by the natives. Comments in Ward (1967) and by Lamont (1867) suggest that the pigs may have been introduced to Tongareva in 1853 from the ship wrecked vessel Chatham. Rats (Rattus sp.) were numerous in 1965, but as no specimens were collected their identity is unknown. Lamont (1867) stated that in 1853 "... [the natives] had never seen an animal larger than a very small rat, that lives principally in the cocoa-nut trees " Lamont's description suggests that the rats on Tongareva are Rattus elegans, a species widely distributed on the Pacific Islands.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 8 Pages

Mauke, Mitiaro and Atiu: Geomorphology of Makatea Islands in the Southern Cooks 2008-05-08

environment - cook islands geography - cook islnads geomorphology - cook islands vegetation - cook islands

Mauke, Mitiaro and Atiu are deeply eroded volcanic islands in the southern Cook Islands, south Pacific, each surrounded by a rim of elevated Cenozoic reef limestone (makatea). This paper presents the results of instrumental topographic surveys of each
island. The maximum elevation of the volcanics is 24.4, 8.9 and 71.0 m on Mauke, Mitiaro and Atiu, respectively, and of the makatea 14.7, 10.9 and 22.1 m. The makatea is fringed on its seaward side and in places partially overlain by a sequence of late Pleistocene reef limestones which reach maximum elevations of 12.7, 7.8 and 12.2 m respectively. These exhibit varied reef facies as well as emergent reef topographies, especially groove-
and-spur systems. Elevated notches, cliff-foot benches and emergent reef flats indicate higher Holocene relative sea-levels at up to at least 3 m above present. These data are compared with similar features on Mangaia, also in the southern Cooks, and the very different topographic and stratigraphic records on Rarotonga and Aitutaki, and the implications of the independent island histories thus revealed for previous discussions of
lithospheric flexure and Pleistocene sea-level change are reviewed.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 71 p.

BioGloss: a glossary of terms relevant to the Convention on Biological Diversity 2010-05-04

biological diversity - convention - glossary

Natural resources derived from the non-living world, e.g. land, water and air.The provision of access to genetic resources within a country and the sharing of benefit derived from the use of genetic resources.Management practices, technologies and policies that promote the positive and mitigate the negative impacts on biodiversity.

Kept in vertical file colletion and also available online|Developed from a variety of sources. Primarily it has been sourced from the Convention on Biological diversity website: http://www.cbd.int/cepa/toolkit/2008/doc/CBD-Toolkit-Glossaries.pdf

Call Number: VF 7065 [EL]

Physical Description: 13 p.

Publisher: Tidal Influence Media Contact Point: SPREP Records and Archives Officer Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Report of the ARDS the develpment and maintainance of a viable, vital and living Tokelau: inter-agency mission, 18-23 November 2006 2009-02-05

living tokelau

In a unique move Tokelau requested all regional and international organizations that it is affiliated to either through full membership, associate or by accessing through regional international projects, to visit and consult Tokelau as a "body corporate" or all at once. The intention is to assist a small tiny country in managing all the possible assistance available from these organizations so that the actual assistance itself could be much more effective in their delivery and avoid duplication.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: various pagings ;29cm

Preliminary Environmental Assessment Report Tafitoala Seawall, Samoa 2012-07-24

assessment report coastal zone management environment - protection - samoa pacific adaptation to climate change (pacc) project samoa

The Government of Samoa under its Environmental Policy Framework established rules and procedures to be followed under IAMP Phase 2 with regard to environmental assessment, monitoring and mitigation of potential negative impacts. For projects with no, or low but acceptable environmental impacts, the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MNRE) may issue a waiver to the proponent from the further requirements of the draft EIA Regulations. In issuing a waiver, the CEO MNRE will rely on the advice of the Assistant CEO, PUMA. Such works are to be covered by Codes of Environmental Practice (COEP) provisions.

Available Online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 24 p.

Negotiations on additional investment and financial flows to address climate change in developing countries 2008-11-19

climate change - investments - oceania

In 2007, the UNFCCC Secretariat prepared a report on
"Investment and Financial Flows to Address Climate
Change".11 The report covers mitigation and adaptation in
various sectors over the period to 2030. The report defines
an investment as the initial (capital) cost of a new physical
asset with a life of more than one year, such as the capital
cost of a gas-fired generating unit or a water supply
system. A financial flow is an ongoing expenditure related
to climate change mitigation or adaptation that docs not
involve physical assets, such as research or health care.
These investment and financial flows arc NOT the same as
the cost of addressing climate change; changes to the
operating costs of investments arc not considered nor arc
damages due to climate change estimated.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 48 p.

Preliminary Environmental Assessment Report for Lalomalava Seawall, Samoa 2012-07-24

coastal zone management environment - protection - samoa pacific adaptation to climate change (pacc) project samoa

The Government of Samoa under its Environmental Policy Framework established rules and procedures to be followed under IAMP Phase 2 with regard to environmental assessment, monitoring and mitigation of potential negative impacts. For projects with no, or low but acceptable environmental impacts, the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MNRE) may issue a waiver to the proponent from the further requirements of the draft EIA Regulations. In issuing a waiver, the CEO MNRE will rely on the advice of the Assistant CEO, PUMA. Such works are to be covered by Codes of Environmental Practice (COEP) provisions.

Available Online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 23 p.

Pacific forever : an education for sustainable development resource [draft] 2008-11-28

marine resource marine resource management marine resources - pacific - oceania protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

One of the greatest challanges we face in protecting our islands biodiversity is how to balance the needs of the people that use it, and the future of the environment. There are many reasons why the Pacific islands way of life is endangered, it is
necessary to address these threats, all of them. Understand ing their causes will help to stop them, if it is possible or to change or adapt our way of life. It is necessary to focus on long term sustainability strategies, but in the mean time develop and carry out short term projects to address the immediate needs of our islands.
As educators you can actively participate in the islands ecosystems, traditions and way of life protection by engaging your students in a productive and active learning experience about what the Pacific islands are facing.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 39 p.

Northern Marshall Islands land biota : birds 2008-06-05

birds - marshall islands fauna - marshall islands land geology - marshall islands

Although ornithological observations have not been the main object of any pliase of our work on the Northern Marshall Islands, numerous notes on birds have accumulated which are here placed on record, The birds were identified by use of Ernst Mayr's "Birds of the Southwest Pacific!' and the names used here are mostly those accepted by Mayr in that work. UnIortunately it was impractical to document these records with specin?ens. The sight observations presented should therefore be acceprcd with some reservations.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 37 p. ; 29 cm

Nukutipipi atoll, Tuamotu archipelago; geomorphology, land and marine flora and fauna and interrelationships 2008-05-08

flora and fauna - geomorphology - french polynesia french polynesia land - geomorphology - french polynesia marine resource marine resource management marine resources - conservation - french polynesia marine resources - french polynesia marine resources - pacific - oceania protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

Nukutipipi atoll (5 km2), of volcanic origin 16-17 million years old on the Pitcairn (hot spot) Hereheretue line, presents a land flora and fauna of low diversity but with a Pisonia forest and hundreds of resident red-tailed tropic birds. Nukutipipi suffered from the 1983 hurricanes : destruction of vegetation and motu as well as sand lagoon mollusc populations. The north and south rims present original geomorphological structures. Lagoon without patch reefs reaching the surface is characterised by dome patch reefs all constituted of dead Acropora with few scleractinian and mollusc species, but an important algae coverage. All these characteristics indicate the precariousness on a time scale of such a so tiny atoll, land and marine, with a closed lagoon.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 50 p.

Government of the Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu : PIMS2162 - Pacific Adapation to Climate Change (PACC) project document 2010-05-04

climate change - adaptation - oceania environment - cook islands environment - protection - samoa pacific adaptation to climate change (pacc) project

For Pacific SIDS, the need for adaptation to climate change has become increasingly urgent. Long-term climate changes, including the increasing frequency and severity of extreme events such as high rainfall, droughts, tropical cyclones, and storm surges are affecting the lives and livelihoods of people in PICs. Coupled with non-climate drivers, such as inappropriate land use, overexploitation of resources, increasing urbanization and population increase, development in the region is increasingly undermined. For the low lying atolls, the likely economic disruption from climate change pressures could be catastrophic, even to the extent of requiring population relocation to other islands or adding numbers to the Pacific diaspora, with the subsequent social and cultural disruption having unknown proportions. Failure to reduce vulnerability could also result in loss of opportunities to manage risks in the future when the impacts may be greater and time to consider options limited.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 138 p.

Notes on the birds of Kwajalein atoll, Marshall Islands 2008-05-08

birds - marshall islands fauna - marshall islands natural resources - conservation - marshall islands

Kwajalein is a crescent-shaped atoll that lies between 09°25' and 08°40'N and between 166°50' and 167°45'E, near the center o£ the western (Ralik) chain of the Marshall Islands (Figure 1). Composed of more than 90 islets, largely uninhabited, Kwajalein Atoll extends about 75 miles from southeast to northwest. It has a land area of about 6 square miles (3,854 acres) (Global Associates 1987), an increase of about 263 acres over the original area that was brought about by filling of land on Kwajalein, Roi-Namur, and Meek Islands.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 96 p.

Ways for Indigenous peoples' groups to advance adaptation concerns and solutions through international fora 2008-11-20

climate change

All over the world Indigenous Peoples are affected by the impacts of climate change. They often live close to the land and depend on its physical resources and richness for their livelihoods and well-being. Their environments are increasingly threatened by, for example, desertification, sea level rise, extreme weather events, and changes in wildlife health, migration patterns and abundance. At the same time, there is evidence that some current attempts to tackle climate change may also have disastrous effects on indigenous groups and communities.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 35 p.

An annotated check list of the corals of American Samoa 2008-05-15

american samoa coral reefs - management - american samoa corals - conservation - american samoa environment - protection marine resource marine resource management marine resources - american samoa marine resources - conservation - american samoa marine resources - pacific - oceania protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

Reef coral collections from American Samoa are in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., and in the Hessisches Landesmuseum, Darmstadt, W. Germany. The author has a collection of 790 coral specimens for a total of 1547 items known to be from American Samoa.
A total of 177 species (including 3 species of non-scleractinian corals) belonging to 48 genera and subgenera (including the genera Millepora and Heliopora) known to date are listed with data as of frequency of occurrence and habitat.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 20 p.

One last chance: tapping indigenous knowledge to produce sustainable conservation policies / W.H. Thomas 2009-03-19

conservation of natural resources indigenous knowledge sustainable conservation policies traditional knowledge

Sustainable development projects that were supposed to insure the future of the earth's biological inheritance are currently being criticized for compromising biodiversity. Drawing on sixteen months of fieldwork with one of Papua New Guinea's most remote societies, this paper argues that more productive conservation policies will emerge when indigenous activities
are viewed as disturbance and not as vehicles for establishing equilibrium with the environment. This research demonstrates that although the Hewa play a significant role in shaping
this environment, their traditions are not always compatible with biodiversity conservation. Finally, policy recommendations based on indigenous knowledge research are offered.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 10 Pages

Community-based fisheries management program 2008-07-25

environment - protection fisheries management - community - oceania marine resource marine resource management marine resources - community participation - oceania marine resources - management - oceania marine resources - pacific - oceania protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

The American Samoa Islands and its surrounding waters contain historical, cultural, and natural resources that must be protected, managed, controlled and preserved for the benefit of all people of the Territory and future generations. The protection of these traditionally valuable resources will enhance and increase fish abundance and size for future catch.

When communities participate in the American Samoan Community Based Fisheries Management Program, they adopt a set of by-laws as part of the process. Until now, these have been very hard to enforce because they were not official rules or regulations of the American Samoan government and therefore communities had little authority to enforce rules that were broken by outsiders. To address this challenge, the AS Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources has been working with the Attorney General to develop a standard set of government rules regulations that communities can choose from when developing their fisheries management plans

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 23 p.

Pacific Islands regional guidelines for whale and dolphin watching 2008-08-08

marine mammals - guidlelines - oceania whales - dolphins - guidelines - oceania

The Pacific Islands region is important for a great number of cetaceans (whales and dolphins), whether as a permanent habitat, a breeding ground or a migration corridor. Currently, more
than thirty species of whales and dolphins have been identified in this area.
The presence and diversity of cetaceans in our region has led to the development of whale watching, both on a commercial and recreational basis. Whale watching is defined as viewing
activities in the natural environment, of any cetacean species from land, sea or air. Today, this activity provides a sustainable use of humpback and other whales that were exploited to less than 5% of their initial abundance earlier this century, and generates many benefits to communities, contributing to sustainable development.

Available online|In English and French|3 copies in both language above

Call Number: 580 PAC [EL],VF 8305

ISBN/ISSN: 978-0-9806235-0-5

Physical Description: 18 p.

Japan's Consortium for International cooperation in cultural Heritage Conservation 2012-05-29

heritage conservation of japan

In key organizations that experts and institutions in various fields involved in cultural heritage international cooperation to participate, the Secretariat National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Tokyo has entrusted management from the Agency for Cultural Affairs. And at the same time to promote network building and information sharing between the consortium members, we have a research and dissemination and awareness-raising activities related to cultural heritage international cooperation activities

1 copy

Call Number: VF 7147

Physical Description: 15 pages

Assessment of implementation of the Pacific Islands Framework for Action on Climate Change (PIFACC) 2010-04-30

climate changes - oceania climatic changes - assessment - oceania climatic changes - oceania

In preparation for the upcoming meeting of the Pacific Climate Change Roundtable (PCCR), to be held in Majuro in October, 2009, the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) commissioned a stocktake of the progress made in implementing the Pacific Islands Framework for Action on Climate Change (PIFACC) in terms of its principles and expected outcomes, with an emphasis on adaptation and the associated enabling environment. SPREP also sought recommendations on how to strengthen the PCCR in its functioning as a mechanism for improved regional coordination of climate change activities related to adaptation initiatives and the associated enabling environment. In addition, SPREP requested that the PCCR be provided with substantive technical and related advice based on an assessment of relevant current and ongoing climate change initiatives in the region.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 20 p.

Report on the examination of suspected dynamite fish (Monotaris grandoculis) from Aleipata 2008-08-06

environment - protection environmental problems - marine resources - samoa marine pollution marine pollution - samoa marine resource marine resource management marine resources - effects - samoa marine resources - pacific - oceania marine resources - samoa pollution protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania samoa

From Closer external and internal examinations,it is therefore conclude that the fish sampled was not caught from spear,gillnet or line and hook but maybe resulted from other means which can inflicted less external body damages such as 'ava niukini','bleach' or 'dynamite'(if postioned further away from the center of the blast).However,it was scientifically proved that fish at a distance of few hundred metres from the center of the blast can be killed by the impact of the underwater travel sound.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 4 Pages

Strategic plan for the Conservation and Management of marine resources in the Pacific Islands region : summary 2009-02-27

marine resource marine resource management marine resources - conservation marine resources - management marine resources - pacific - oceania marine resources - strategic plan protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

In April 2003, he National Marine Fisheries Service(NMFS,also known as NOAA Fisheries) transferred the responsibility for man aging the marine resources infederal waters surrounding the US Pacific Islands from NOAA Fisheries' Southwest Region based in california to the newly defined pacific islands region based in Hawaii.The Pacific Islands Region was established with the explicit intent of employing regional expertise to provide improved customer service and stewardship of living marine resources within the expansive geographic region of the western pacific. The region's area of jurisdiction includes both domestic(Exclusive Economic Zone) and international waters(See map) throughout the central and western Pacific ocean.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 24 p.

Fishery ecosystem plan for the American Samoa archipelago 2009-02-26

american samoa environment - protection fisheries - ecosystem - american samoa fisheries - policy and planning - american samoa marine resource marine resource management marine resources - american samoa marine resources - management - american samoa marine resources - pacific - oceania protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

This American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan (FEP) was developed by the Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council and represents the first step in an incremental and collaborative approach to implement ecosystem approaches to fishery management in American Samoa.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 245 p.

Declines in Finfish resources in Tarawa lagoon, Kiribati, emphasize the need for increased conservation effort / Jim Beets 2008-05-06

fisheries resources - conservation - kiribati kiribati marine resource marine resource management marine resources - conservation - kiribati marine resources - kiribati marine resources - pacific - oceania protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

The very productive lagoon fisheries of Tarawa atoll changed greatly in recent decades as human development and intensive harvesting increased. Tarawa typifies the increasingly common condition of resource depletion and marine community structure change with expanding human activities and population growth. Fisheries-dependent reports have documented the change in fisher landings for nearly two decades. A comparison of fisheries-independent data collected during 1992-93 with data collected in 1977 allowed for documentation of large changes in important finfish resources in Tarawa Lagoon. The historically important bonefish (Albula glossodonta), like other important fishery species, demonstrated declines in catch-per-unit effort (CPUE), proportion of catch, mean length and weight (1977: 46.4 cm, 1.31 kg; 1992-93: 37.6 cm and 0.84 kg), and sex ratio (1977: 0.71:1 [F:M]; 1992-93: 0.15:1). Beach seine sampling of bait fishes demonstrated a major shift in species composition between 1977 and 1992- 93, with severe depletion of some preferred species. These results suggest declining abundance in locally important fish species and large changes in species composition within Tarawa Lagoon.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 16 p.

Solomon Islands: State of Environment report (SOE) 2008 2008-12-03

conservation of natural resources - solomon islands environment - conservation - solomon islands environmental protection - solomon islands

The report was commissioned at the end of May 2008 with delivery of the final product by end June 2008. As such, it has been
researched and written over a very compressed timeline. Considerable shortcomings and inconsistencies in data
needed to be tackled in this period, and so a rapid desk assessment approach was used with limited opportunity for peer review and feedback.

Available online|1 copy

Call Number: 333.72 PAC [EL]

Physical Description: 97 p.

Regional assessment of the vulnerability and resilience of Pacific islands to the impacts of Global Climate change and accelerated sea-level rise 2008-11-28

global climate change

There is now a consensus that there is a discernible human influence on global climate. The form these global changes will take in the Pacific is far less certain, but the most significant and more immediate consequences are likely to be related to changes in rainfall regimes and soil moisture budgets, prevailing winds (both speed and direction) and in regional and local sea levels and patterns of wave action.

Available online

Call Number: 341.7623[EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 982-04-0194-1

Physical Description: 84 p.

Enhancing the UN system information exchnge on Environmental Capacity building (ECB): a study on the existing UN system information exchange networks linked to environmental capacity building for consideration the Environmental Management group (EMG) 2008-07-25

environmental information - capacity building - oceania information management - environment - oceania

This paper aims to provide an overview of the existing policy framework, activities and coordinating arrangements in the area of UN inter-agency information exchange concerning environmental capacity building. It has been prepared for the Environmental Management Group (EMG) by an independent consultant who is familiar with UN information exchange networks concerning environmental capacity building that are operating within the United Nations. The paper aims to identify opportunities for enhancing UN system information exchange and coordination in the area of environmental capacity building and to explore possible areas in which the EMG might provide added value.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 46 p.

Development, forest conservation and adaptation to climate change: a case for integrated community-based sustainability in rural Vanuatu 2009-03-30

forest conservation - adaptation - climate change - vanuatu forest conservation - development - climate change - vanuatu forest conservation - sustainability - vanuatu

This paper is concerned with integrating adaptation to climate change with local development in the context of a climate change mitigation project for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. It is argued that integration will enhance locally appropriate and sustainable outcomes necessary for effective forest conservation in the context of rural Vanuatu. Concurrently, a community- based approach to assessing vulnerability is proposed whereby locally pertinent manifestations of climate- related exposure and adaptive capacity form the baseline of adaptive decision-making for integrated forest conservation and development. The approach is illustrated by a discussion of vulnerability and local development needs in the Tangoa Island community, South Santo, Vanuatu - a community particularly affected by tropical cyclones. Although effective adaptive strategies have evolved over time in Tangoa, these are unlikely to withstand the likely changes in magnitude and (perhaps) frequency of cyclones into the future with climate change. This is due to evolving non-climate stresses that largely intersect with locally defined development needs. Opportunities exist to reduce vulnerability to climate change by development pathways that address particular non-climate stresses. This provides a practical and tangible way of engendering community-based adaptation that would otherwise be unlikely in rural Vanuatu. The approach has application in other rural developing communities, both in Vanuatu and other developing countries.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 31 p.

Global Programme of Action for the Protecting coastal and marine environments from land-based activities : a guide for national action 2008-04-22

coastal areas coastal resources - protection land based activities - effects - environment marine resource marine resource management marine resources - pacific - oceania marine resources - protection protected areas protected areas - management protected areas - oceania

Coastal areas and oceans are complex and fragile environments with many different functions linked to public health, food security, and other economic and social benefits. These are also decisive elements in the alleviation of poverty. Healthy estuarine, near-shore and oceanic systems provide cultural heritage, food, building materials, traditional livelihoods, tourism opportunities, transportation routes, storm protection, organisms for biotechnology and many more benefits that are frequently overlooked or abused.

Available electronically

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 107 p.

Implementing Sustainable bioenergy production: a compliation of tools and approaches 2009-02-05

bioenergy production

Bioenergy occupies a unique position at the nexus of energy, environment, climate change and rural development agendas. Consequently, bioenergy and biofuels in particular, have seen
record levels of support in the form of subsidies, mandates and investments as governments seek to maximize the perceived synergies between the various opportunities offered by bioenergy. Whilst it is true that well- planned bioenergy development can reduce greenhouse gas emissions from a range of sources, increase rural incomes, reduce waste, improve access
to energy, and improve overall energy security and independence - the reality is that current expansion of production, particularly of first-generation liquid biofuels, is increasingly cause for concern.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

ISBN/ISSN: 978-2-8317-1131-7

Physical Description: 32 p.

Taking steps: mainstreaming national adaptation 2009-04-14

climate change - adaptation - oceania climate change - vulnerability - oceania

Climate change poses a massive threat to development. The poorest populations of poor countries - the Least Developed Countries, Small Island Developing States, and the nations of Africa - face the concentrated challenge of tackling the worst of the impacts with the least capacity to do so. Clearly, adaptation to climate impacts must be seamlessly integrated into any development planning and policy. This four- step plan for mainstreaming climate change aims to fulfil that need. A 'learning by doing approach, it focuses first on national capacity to ensure that development in all sectors and at all levels is effectively climate-proofed.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 4 Pages

National compliance action strategy to implement the Montreal protocol on substances that deplete the ozone layer in Tuvalu 2008-08-14

climate change - effects - tuvalu ozone layer - depletion - tuvalu sea level rise - effects - tuvalu

Tuvalu is comprised of nine small islands, six of them being atoll islands (with lagoons) namely Nanumea, Nui, Vaitupu, Nukufetau, Funafuti, and Nukulaelae. The remaining three,
Nanumanga, Niutao and Niulakita are raised limestone reef islands. None of the islands are more than three metres above sea level, with the biggest island, Vaitupu, having a land area of just over 1000 acres. The total land area is approximately twenty-six square kilometres with a sea area of 900,000 square kilometres. During the pre-independence period, 1938 - 1978,
Tuvalu was a British Colony called the "Gilbert and Ellice Islands Colony (GEIC). The islands are located between latitudes 5 degrees and 11 degrees south of the equator and between longitudes 176 degrees and 179 degrees east of Greenwich. To the north, about 1400 km is the Republic of Kiribati and to the south, 1100 km is the Republic of Fiji.

Available online

Call Number: [EL],VF5089

Physical Description: 15 p.

OpenStreetMap Data Wallis and Futuna 2020-10-06

gis map open source osm pacific spatial

OpenStreetMap (OSM) is a free, editable map & spatial database of the whole world. This dataset is an extract of OpenStreetMap data for Wallis and Futuna in a GIS-friendly format.

The OSM data has been split into separate layers based on themes (buildings, roads, points of interest, etc), and it comes bundled with a QGIS project and styles, to help you get started with using the data in your maps. This OSM product will be updated weekly.

The goal is to increase awareness among Pacific GIS users of the richness of OpenStreetMap data in Pacific countries, as well as the gaps, so that they can take advantage of this free resource, become interested in contributing to OSM, and perhaps join the global OSM community.

OpenStreetMap Data French Polynesia 2020-10-06

gis map open source osm pacific spatial

OpenStreetMap (OSM) is a free, editable map & spatial database of the whole world. This dataset is an extract of OpenStreetMap data for French Polynesia in a GIS-friendly format.

The OSM data has been split into separate layers based on themes (buildings, roads, points of interest, etc), and it comes bundled with a QGIS project and styles, to help you get started with using the data in your maps. This OSM product will be updated weekly.

The goal is to increase awareness among Pacific GIS users of the richness of OpenStreetMap data in Pacific countries, as well as the gaps, so that they can take advantage of this free resource, become interested in contributing to OSM, and perhaps join the global OSM community.

OpenStreetMap data is open data, with a very permissive licence. You can download it and use it for
any purpose you like, as long as you credit OpenStreetMap and its contributors. You don't have to
pay anyone, or ask anyone's permission. When you download and use the data, you're granted
permission to do that under the Open Database Licence (ODbL). The only conditions are that you
Attribute, Share-Alike, and Keep open.

The required credit is “© OpenStreetMap contributors”. If you make a map, you should display this
credit somewhere. If you provide the data to someone else, you should make sure the license
accompanies the data

OpenStreetMap Data Northern Mariana Islands 2020-10-06

gis map open source osm pacific spatial

OpenStreetMap (OSM) is a free, editable map & spatial database of the whole world. This dataset is an extract of OpenStreetMap data for the Northern Mariana Islands in a GIS-friendly format.

The OSM data has been split into separate layers based on themes (buildings, roads, points of interest, etc), and it comes bundled with a QGIS project and styles, to help you get started with using the data in your maps. This OSM product will be updated weekly.

The goal is to increase awareness among Pacific GIS users of the richness of OpenStreetMap data in Pacific countries, as well as the gaps, so that they can take advantage of this free resource, become interested in contributing to OSM, and perhaps join the global OSM community.

OpenStreetMap Data Guam 2020-10-06

gis map open source osm pacific spatial

OpenStreetMap (OSM) is a free, editable map & spatial database of the whole world. This dataset is an extract of OpenStreetMap data for Guam in a GIS-friendly format.

The OSM data has been split into separate layers based on themes (buildings, roads, points of interest, etc), and it comes bundled with a QGIS project and styles, to help you get started with using the data in your maps. This OSM product will be updated weekly.

The goal is to increase awareness among Pacific GIS users of the richness of OpenStreetMap data in Pacific countries, as well as the gaps, so that they can take advantage of this free resource, become interested in contributing to OSM, and perhaps join the global OSM community.

Modelled Global Distribution of the Seagrass Biome - United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre 2020-09-21

Biodiversity Coastal and Marine biome biopama2 conservation data distribution geo gis seagrass unep-wcmc

This is a MaxEnt model map of the global distribution of the seagrass biome. Species occurrence records were extracted from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), United Nations Environment Programme-World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) Ocean Data Viewer and Ocean biogeographic information system (OBIS). This map shows the suitable habitats for the seagrass distribution at global scale.

Citation:
Jayathilake D.R.M., Costello M.J. 2018. A modelled global distribution of the seagrass biome. Biological Conservation.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2018.07.009

Use Constraints:
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported (CC BY 4.0). https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Free to (1) copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, (2) remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially. You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: D. Jayathilake Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Global Distribution of Modelled Mangrove Biomass - United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre 2020-09-21

Biodiversity Coastal and Marine biomass biopama2 conservation data distribution geo gis global mangrove unep-wcmc

This dataset shows the modelled global patterns of above-ground biomass of mangrove forests. The dataset was developed by the Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, with support from The Nature Conservancy. The work is based on a review of 95 field studies on carbon storage and fluxes in mangroves world-wide. A climate-based model for potential mangrove above-ground biomass was developed, with almost four times the explanatory power of the only previous published model. The map highlights the high variability in mangrove above-ground biomass and indicates areas that could be prioritised for mangrove conservation and restoration.

Citation:
Hutchison J, Manica A, Swetnam R, Balmford A, Spalding M (2014) Predicting global patterns in mangrove forest biomass. Conservation Letters 7(3): 233–240. doi: 10.1111/conl.12060;
http://data.unep-wcmc.org/datasets/39

Use Constraints:
UNEP-WCMC General Data License. For commercial use, please contact business-support@unep-wcmc.org.

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Mark Spalding Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Global Distribution of Coral Reefs - United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre 2020-09-21

Coastal and Marine biopama2 conservation coral data distribution geo gis global marine

This dataset shows the global distribution of coral reefs in tropical and subtropical regions. It is the most comprehensive global dataset of warm-water coral reefs to date, acting as a foundation baseline map for future, more detailed, work. This dataset was compiled from a number of sources by UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) and the WorldFish Centre, in collaboration with WRI (World Resources Institute) and TNC (The Nature Conservancy). Data sources include the Millennium Coral Reef Mapping Project (IMaRS-USF and IRD 2005, IMaRS-USF 2005) and the World Atlas of Coral Reefs (Spalding et al. 2001).

Citation:
UNEP-WCMC, WorldFish Centre, WRI, TNC (2018). Global distribution of warm-water coral reefs, compiled from multiple sources including the Millennium Coral Reef Mapping Project. Version 4.0. Includes contributions from IMaRS-USF and IRD (2005), IMaRS-USF (2005) and Spalding et al. (2001). Cambridge (UK): UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre. URL:
http://data.unep-wcmc.org/datasets/1

Citations for the separate entities:
IMaRS-USF (Institute for Marine Remote Sensing-University of South Florida) (2005). Millennium Coral Reef Mapping Project. Unvalidated maps. These maps are unendorsed by IRD, but were further interpreted by UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre. Cambridge (UK): UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre

IMaRS-USF, IRD (Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement) (2005). Millennium Coral Reef Mapping Project. Validated maps. Cambridge (UK): UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre

Spalding MD, Ravilious C, Green EP (2001). World Atlas of Coral Reefs. Berkeley (California, USA): The University of California Press. 436 pp.

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Dr. Naomi Kingston Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Global Distribution of Cold-water Corals - United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre 2020-09-21

Coastal and Marine biopama2 cold water cold-water conservation coral data geo gis global unep-wcmc

This dataset shows the global distribution of cold-water corals. Occurrence records are given for 86 Families under the subclass Octocorallia (octocorals; also known as Alcyonaria) and four Orders (in Class Anthozoa): Scleractinia (reef-forming corals), Antipatharia (black corals), Zoanthidae (encrusting or button polyps), and Pennatulacea (sea pens). Occurrence records are also available for the order sub-Order Filifera (lace corals) in Class Hydrozoa.

Citations:
Freiwald A, Rogers A, Hall-Spencer J, Guinotte JM, Davies AJ, Yesson C, Martin CS, Weatherdon LV (2017). Global distribution of cold-water corals (version 5.0). Fifth update to the dataset in Freiwald et al. (2004) by UNEP-WCMC, in collaboration with Andre Freiwald and John Guinotte. Cambridge (UK): UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre. URL:
http://data.unep-wcmc.org/datasets/3

Other cited reference(s):
Freiwald A, Fosså JH, Grehan A, Koslow T, Roberts JM (2004). Cold-water coral reefs: out of sight – no longer out of mind. Biodiversity Series 22. Cambridge (UK): UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre. 86 pp. URL: https://archive.org/details/coldwatercoralre04frei

OSPAR Commission. (2015) OSPAR Threatened and/or Declining Habitats 2015. URL: http://www.ospar.org/work-areas/bdc/species-habitats/list-of-threatened-.... Data URL: http://www.emodnet-seabedhabitats.eu/download.

Use Constraints:
UNEP-WCMC General Data License.
For commercial use, please contact business-support@unep-wcmc.org.

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Dr. Steve Fletcher Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Marine Bioregions of the Southwest Pacific - Marine and Coastal Biodiversity Management in Pacific Island Countries (MACBIO) 2020-09-01

Coastal and Marine biopama2 bioregions conservation data deepwater geo gis iucn macbio reef

Bioregions, of course, are just one of the important data layers in indentifying an ecologically representative system of marine protected areas. To be truly ecologically representative and comprehensive, one must also consider all available information about habitats, species and ecological processes. In addition, socio-economic and cultural considerations are vital in the spatial planning process. This report is focussed upon one important, but only one, input to marine spatial planning: the development of marine bioregions.

To take account of differing types and resolution of data, two separate bioregionalisations were developed; firstly, for the deepwater environments and secondly for reef-associated environments. For the deepwater, thirty, mainly physical, environmental variables were assessed to be adequately comprehensive and reliable to be included in the analysis. These data were allocated to over 140 000 grid cells of 20x20 km across the Southwest Pacific. K-means and then hierarchical cluster analyses were then conducted to identify groups of analytical units that contained similar environmental conditions. The number of clusters was determined by examining the dendrogram and setting a similarity value that aligned with a natural break in similarity.

For the second bioregionalisation, reef-associated datasets of more than 200 fish, coral and other invertebrate species were collated from multiple data providers who sampled over 6500 sites. We combined these datasets, which were quality-checked for taxonomic consistency and normalised, resulting in more than 800 species that could be used in further analysis. All these species data and seven independent environmental datasets were then allocated to over 45,000 grid cells of 9x9 km across the SW Pacific. Next, the probability of observing these species was predicted, using the environmental variables, for grid cells within the unsurveyed reef-associated habitats. Hierarchical cluster analysis was then applied to the reef-associated datasets to deliver clusters of grid cells with high similarity.

The final analytical steps, applied to all the outputs, were to refine the resulting clusters using manual spatial processing and to describe each cluster to deliver the draft bioregions. This work resulted in 262 draft deepwater marine bioregions and 102 draft reef-associated bioregions across the SW Pacific.

Please cite this dataset as:
Wendt H., Beger M., Sullivan J., LeGrand J., Davey K., Yakub N., Fernandes L. 2018. Draft marine bioregions of the Southwest Pacific.” GIZ, IUCN, SPREP: Suva.

Marine Species Biodiversity - AquaMaps 2020-08-31

Biodiversity Coastal and Marine biodiversity biopama2 conservation data geo gis marine species species richness

AquaMaps are computer-generated predictions of natural occurrence of marine species, based on the environmental tolerance of a given species with respect to depth, salinity, temperature, primary productivity, and its association with sea ice or coastal areas. These 'environmental envelopes' are matched against an authority file which contains respective information for the Oceans of the World. Independent knowledge such as distribution by FAO areas or bounding boxes are used to avoid mapping species in areas that contain suitable habitat, but are not occupied by the species. Maps show the color-coded likelihood of a species to occur in a half-degree cell, with about 50 km side length near the equator. Experts are able to review, modify and approve maps.

Environmental envelopes are created in part (FAO areas, bounding boxes, depth ranges) from respective information in species databases such as FishBase and in part from occurrence records available from OBIS or GBIF. AquaMaps predictions have been validated successfully for a number of species using independent data sets and the model was shown to perform equally well or better than other standard species distribution models, when faced with the currently existing suboptimal input data sets (Ready et al. 2010).

The creation of AquaMaps is supported by the following projects: MARA, Pew Fellows Program in Marine Conservation, INCOFISH, Sea Around Us, and Biogeoinformatics of Hexacorals.

Kaschner, K., D.P. Tittensor, J. Ready, T Gerrodette and B. Worm (2011). Current and Future Patterns of Global Marine Mammal Biodiversity. PLoS ONE 6(5): e19653. PDF

Ready, J., K. Kaschner, A.B. South, P.D Eastwood, T. Rees, J. Rius, E. Agbayani, S. Kullander and R. Froese (2010). Predicting the distributions of marine organisms at the global scale. Ecological Modelling 221(3): 467-478. PDF

Copyright
Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License. (CC-BY-NC)
You are welcome to include maps from
www.aquamaps.org in your own web sites for non-commercial use, given that such inserts are clearly identified as coming from AquaMaps, with a backward link to the respective source page.

Contacts
Rainer Froese, GEOMAR, Coordinator rfroese@geomar.de
Kristin Kaschner, Uni Freiburg, model development Kristin.Kaschner@biologie.uni-freiburg.de
Ma. Lourdes D. Palomares, UBC, extension to non-fish marine organisms m.palomares@fisheries.ubc.ca
Sven Kullander, NRM, extension to freshwater ve-sven@nrm.se
Jonathan Ready, NRM, implementation jonathan.ready@gmail.com
Tony Rees, formerly with CSIRO, mapping tools Tony.Rees@marinespecies.org
Paul Eastwood, SOPAC, validation Paul.Eastwood@sopac.org
Andy South, CEFAS, validation andy.south@cefas.co.uk
Josephine Rius-Barile, Q-quatics, database programming / data collection j.barile@q-quatics.org
Cristina Garilao, GEOMAR, web programming cgarilao@geomar.de
Kathleen Kesner-Reyes, Q-quatics, map validation k.reyes@q-quatics.org
Elizabeth Bato, Q-quatics, map validation (non-fish) e.david@q-quatics.org

Citing AquaMaps

General citation
Kaschner, K., K. Kesner-Reyes, C. Garilao, J. Rius-Barile, T. Rees, and R. Froese. 2019. AquaMaps: Predicted range maps for aquatic species. World wide web electronic publication, www.aquamaps.org, version 10/2019.

Cite individual maps as, e.g.,
Computer Generated Map for Gadus morhua (Atlantic cod). www.aquamaps.org, version 10/2019 (accessed 01 Oct 2019).

Reviewed Native Distribution Map for Gadus morhua (Atlantic cod). www.aquamaps.org, version 10/2019 (accessed 01 Oct 2019).

Cite biodiversity maps as, e.g.,
Shark and Ray Biodiversity Map. www.aquamaps.org, version 10/2019 (accessed 01 Oct 2019).

Cite the environmental dataset as, e.g.,
Kesner-Reyes, K., Segschneider, J., Garilao, C., Schneider, B., Rius-Barile, J., Kaschner, K., and Froese, R.(editors). AquaMaps Environmental Dataset: Half-Degree Cells Authority File (HCAF). World Wide Web electronic publication, www.aquamaps.org/main/envt_main.php, ver. 7, 10/2019.

Using Full or Large Sets of AquaMaps Data
We encourage partnering with the AquaMaps team for larger research projects or publications that would make intensive use of AquaMaps to ensure that you have access to the latest version and/or reviewed maps, the limitations of the data set are clearly understood and addressed, and that critical maps and/or unlikely results are recognized as such and double-checked for correctness prior to drawing conclusions and/or subsequent publication.

The AquaMaps team can be contacted through Rainer Froese (rfroese@geomar.de) or Kristin Kaschner (Kristin.Kaschner@biologie.uni-freiburg.de).

Privacy Policy
AquaMaps uses log data generate usage statistics. Like most websites, AquMaps gathers information about internet protocol (IP) addresses, browser, referring pages, operating system, date/time, clicks, and visited pages, and store it in log files. This information is used to find errors in our website, analyze trends, and determine country of origin of our users. The log files are stored indefinitely. Only the administrators of the AquaMaps server has direct access to the log files. The information is used to inform further development of AquaMaps. Usage statistics may be shared with third parties for non-commercial purposes.

Disclaimer
AquaMaps generates standardized computer-generated and fairly reliable large scale predictions of marine and freshwater species. Although the AquaMaps team and their collaborators have obtained data from sources believed to be reliable and have made every reasonable effort to ensure its accuracy, many maps have not yet been verified by experts and we strongly suggest you verify species occurrences with independent sources before usage. We will not be held responsible for any consequence from the use or misuse of these data and/or maps by any organization or individual.

Copyright
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-NC). You are welcome to include text, numbers and maps from AquaMaps in your own web sites for non-commercial use, given that such inserts are clearly identified as coming from AquaMaps, with a backward link to the respective source page. Note that although species photos and drawings draw mainly from FishBase and SeaLifeBase, they belong to the indicated persons or organizations and have their own copyright statements.

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Rainer Froese, GEOMAR, Coordinator Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Deep Water Fisheries Catch - Sea Around Us 2020-08-31

Coastal and Marine biopama2 catch conservation data deepwater fish fisheries geo gis stock

The Sea Around Us is a research initiative at The University of British Columbia (located at the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, formerly Fisheries Centre) that assesses the impact of fisheries on the marine ecosystems of the world, and offers mitigating solutions to a range of stakeholders.

The Sea Around Us was initiated in collaboration with The Pew Charitable Trusts in 1999, and in 2014, the Sea Around Us also began a collaboration with The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation to provide African and Asian countries with more accurate and comprehensive fisheries data.

The Sea Around Us provides data and analyses through View Data, articles in peer-reviewed journals, and other media (News). The Sea Around Us regularly update products at the scale of countries’ Exclusive Economic Zones, Large Marine Ecosystems, the High Seas and other spatial scales, and as global maps and summaries.

The Sea Around Us emphasizes catch time series starting in 1950, and related series (e.g., landed value and catch by flag state, fishing sector and catch type), and fisheries-related information on every maritime country (e.g., government subsidies, marine biodiversity). Information is also offered on sub-projects, e.g., the historic expansion of fisheries, the performance of Regional Fisheries Management Organizations, or the likely impact of climate change on fisheries.

The information and data presented on their website is freely available to any user, granted that its source is acknowledged. The Sea Around Us is aware that this information may be incomplete. Please let them know about this via the feedback options available on this website.

If you cite or display any content from the Site, or reference the Sea Around Us, the Sea Around Us – Indian Ocean, the University of British Columbia or the University of Western Australia, in any format, written or otherwise, including print or web publications, presentations, grant applications, websites, other online applications such as blogs, or other works, you must provide appropriate acknowledgement using a citation consistent with the following standard:

When referring to various datasets downloaded from the website, and/or its concept or design, or to several datasets extracted from its underlying databases, cite its architects.
Example: Pauly D., Zeller D., Palomares M.L.D. (Editors), 2020. Sea Around Us Concepts, Design and Data (seaaroundus.org).

When referring to a set of values extracted for a given country, EEZ or territory, cite the most recent catch reconstruction report or paper (available on the website) for that country, EEZ or territory.
Example: For the Mexican Pacific EEZ, the citation should be “Cisneros-Montemayor AM, Cisneros-Mata MA, Harper S and Pauly D (2015) Unreported marine fisheries catch in Mexico, 1950-2010. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2015-22, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. 9 p.”, which is accessible on the EEZ page for Mexico (Pacific) on seaaroundus.org.

To help us track the use of Sea Around Us data, we would appreciate you also citing Pauly, Zeller, and Palomares (2020) as the source of the information in an appropriate part of your text;

When using data from our website that are not part of a typical catch reconstruction (e.g., catches by LME or other spatial entity, subsidies given to fisheries, the estuaries in a given country, or the surface area of a given EEZ), cite both the website and the study that generated the underlying database. Many of these can be derived from the ’methods’ texts associated with data pages on seaaroundus.org.
Example: Sumaila et al. (2010) for subsides, Alder (2003) for estuaries and Claus et al. (2014) for EEZ delineations, respectively.

The Sea Around Us data are (where not otherwise regulated) under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). Notices regarding copyrights (© The University of British Columbia), license and disclaimer can be found under http://www.seaaroundus.org/terms-and-conditions/.
References:

Alder J (2003) Putting the coast in the Sea Around Us Project. The Sea Around Us Newsletter (15): 1-2.

Cisneros-Montemayor AM, Cisneros-Mata MA, Harper S and Pauly D (2015) Unreported marine fisheries catch in Mexico, 1950-2010. Fisheries Centre Working Paper #2015-22, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. 9 p.

Pauly D, Zeller D, and Palomares M.L.D. (Editors) (2020) Sea Around Us Concepts, Design and Data (www.seaaroundus.org)

Claus S, De Hauwere N, Vanhoorne B, Deckers P, Souza Dias F, Hernandez F and Mees J (2014) Marine Regions: Towards a global standard for georeferenced marine names and boundaries. Marine Geodesy 37(2): 99-125.

Sumaila UR, Khan A, Dyck A, Watson R, Munro R, Tydemers P and Pauly D (2010) A bottom-up re-estimation of global fisheries subsidies. Journal of Bioeconomics 12: 201-225.

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Sea Around Us Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Aggregated Catch/Effort Data - Western and Central Fisheries Commission 2020-08-31

Coastal and Marine aggregated catch biopama2 catch conservation data fish fisheries geo gis

The Western and Central Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) have compiled a public domain version of aggregated catch and effort data using operational, aggregate and annual catch estimates data provided by Commission Members (CCMs) and Cooperating Non-members (CNMs). The data provided herein have been prepared for dissemination in accordance with the current “Rules and Procedures for the Protection, Access to, and Dissemination of Data Compiled by the Commission” or (“RAP”).

Paragraph 9 of the Rules and Procedures indicates that "Catch and Effort data in the public domain shall be made up of observations from a minimum of three vessels". However, the majority of aggregate data provided to WPCFC do not indicate how many vessels were active in each cell of data which would allow data to be directly filtered according to this rule. Instead, the individual cells where "effort" is less than or equal to the maximum value estimated to represent the activities of two vessels have been removed from the public domain data (the cells are retained with their time/area information, but all catch and effort information in these have been set to zero). Statistics showing how much data have been removed according to this RAP requirement are provided in the documentation for the longline and purse seine public domain data.

All public domain data have been aggregated by year/month and 5°x5° grid. Annex 2 of the RAP indicates that public domain aggregated catch/effort data can be made available at a higher resolution (e.g. data with a breakdown by vessel nation, and aggregated by 1°x1° grids for surface fisheries); however, if the public domain data were provided at these higher levels of resolution implementation of the RAP "three-vessel rule" with the current aggregate data set would result in too many cells being removed.

However, please note that the data that have been removed from the public domain dataset, available on this webpage, are still potentially accessible via other provisions of the RAP (refer to section 4.6 and para 34).

Each public domain zip file contains two files: (1) a CSV file containing the data; (2) a PDF file containing the field names/formats and the coverage with respect to the data file.

These data files were last updated on the 27th July 2020.

Ocean Data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 2020-08-31

Atmosphere and Climate Land Coastal and Marine biopama2 chlorophyll conservation data geo gis marine modis sea surface temperature

MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (originally known as EOS AM-1) and Aqua (originally known as EOS PM-1) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth is timed so that it passes from north to south across the equator in the morning, while Aqua passes south to north over the equator in the afternoon. Terra MODIS and Aqua MODIS are viewing the entire Earth's surface every 1 to 2 days, acquiring data in 36 spectral bands, or groups of wavelengths (see MODIS Technical Specifications). These data will improve our understanding of global dynamics and processes occurring on the land, in the oceans, and in the lower atmosphere. MODIS is playing a vital role in the development of validated, global, interactive Earth system models able to predict global change accurately enough to assist policy makers in making sound decisions concerning the protection of our environment.

Terra
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Ocean Ecology Laboratory, Ocean Biology Processing Group; (2014): MODIS-Terra Ocean Color Data; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Ocean Ecology Laboratory, Ocean Biology Processing Group.
http://dx.doi.org/10.5067/TERRA/MODIS_OC.2014.0
Accessed on 07/28/2015.

Aqua
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Ocean Ecology Laboratory, Ocean Biology Processing Group; (2014): MODIS-Aqua Ocean Color Data; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Ocean Ecology Laboratory, Ocean Biology Processing Group. http://dx.doi.org/10.5067/AQUA/MODIS_OC.2014.0
Accessed on 07/28/2015.

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Shannell Frazier, NASA Official Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Ocean Currents - Ocean Surface Current Analysis Real-time (OSCAR) 2020-08-31

Coastal and Marine biopama2 conservation currents data geo gis ocean ocean currents sea surface

OSCAR (Ocean Surface Current Analysis Real-time) contains near-surface ocean current estimates, derived using quasi-linear and steady flow momentum equations. The horizontal velocity is directly estimated from sea surface height, surface vector wind and sea surface temperature. These data were collected from the various satellites and in situ instruments. The model formulation combines geostrophic, Ekman and Stommel shear dynamics, and a complementary term from the surface buoyancy gradient. Data are on a 1/3 degree grid with a 5 day resolution. OSCAR is generated by Earth Space Research (ESR) https://www.esr.org/research/oscar/oscar-surface-currents/

Citation: ESR. 2009. OSCAR third degree resolution ocean surface currents. Ver. 1. PO.DAAC, CA, USA. Dataset accessed [YYYY-MM-DD] at https://doi.org/10.5067/OSCAR-03D01.

Journal Reference Bonjean, F., and G. S. E. Lagerloef, 2002. Diagnostic model and analysis of the surface currents in the tropical Pacific Ocean. J. Phys. Oceanogr., vol. 32, pg. 2938-2954.

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Kathleen Dohan Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Earthquake Centers - United States Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards Program 2020-08-31

Land Coastal and Marine biopama2 conservation data earthquake earthquakes geo gis hazard pacific usgs

The USGS Earthquake Hazards Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is part of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

The USGS role in NEHRP is to provide Earth sciences information and products for earthquake loss reduction. The goals of the USGS' Earthquake Hazards Program are:
* Improve earthquake hazard identification and risk assessment methods and their use;
* Maintain and improve comprehensive earthquake monitoring in the United States with focus on "real-time" systems in urban areas;
* Improve the understanding of earthquakes occurrence and their effects and consequences.

This dataset can be used to provide and apply relevant earthquake science information and knowledge for reducing deaths, injuries, and property damage from earthquakes through understanding of their characteristics and effects and by providing the information and knowledge needed to mitigate these losses.

Global Distribution of Hydrothermal Vent Fields (2020) - InterRidge Global Database of Active Submarine Hydrothermal Vent Fields 3.4 2020-08-30

Coastal and Marine benthic biopama2 conservation data deepsea geo gis hydrothermal marine vents

The InterRidge Vents Database is a global database of submarine hydrothermal vent fields. The InterRidge Vents Database is supported by the InterRidge program for international cooperation in ridge-crest studies (www.interridge.org).

Purpose of the database
The purpose of the InterRidge Global Database of Active Submarine Hydrothermal Vent Fields, hereafter referred to as the “InterRidge Vents Database,” is to provide a comprehensive list of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields for use in academic research and education. As stated by the InterRidge Working Group (WG) on Global Distribution of Hydrothermal Activity (InterRidge News 9.1, April 2000): “The idea of this data-base is that it should become the international standard for all known sites of submarine hydrothermal activity which can be updated simply by submitting an electronic message to the InterRidge Office."

Version 3.4 was completed on 25 March 2020 and and is published at PANGAEA® Data Publisher:
Beaulieu, Stace E; Szafrański, Kamil M (2020) InterRidge Global Database of Active Submarine Hydrothermal Vent Fields Version 3.4. PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.917894 (temporary link https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.917894)

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Dr. Stace Beaulieu Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Coral Reef Threats - Reefs at Risk 2020-08-29

Land Coastal and Marine biopama2 conservation coral reefs data geo gis reefs reefs at risk threats

Reefs at Risk Revisited is a high-resolution update of the original global analysis, Reefs at Risk: A Map-Based Indicator of Threats to the World’s Coral Reefs. Reefs at Risk Revisited uses a global map of coral reefs at 500-m resolution, which is 64 times more detailed than the 4-km resolution map used in the 1998 analysis, and benefits from improvements in many global data sets used to evaluate threats to reefs (most threat data are at 1 km resolution, which is 16 times more detailed than those used in the 1998 analysis).

Like the original Reefs at Risk, this study evaluates threats to coral reefs from a wide range of human activities. For the first time, it also includes an assessment of climate-related threats to reefs. In addition, Reefs at Risk Revisited includes a global assessment of the vulnerability of nations and territories to coral reef degradation, based on their dependence on coral reefs and their capacity to adapt.

WRI led the Reefs at Risk Revisited analysis in collaboration with a broad partnership of more than 25 research, conservation, and educational organizations. Partners have provided data, offered guidance on the analytical approach, contributed to the report, and served as critical reviewers of the maps and findings.

Reefs at Risk Revisited is a project of the World Resources Institute (WRI), developed and implemented in close collaboration with:
The Nature Conservancy (TNC)
WorldFish Center
International Coral Reef Action Network (ICRAN)
United Nations Environment Programme - World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC)
Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network (GCRMN)

Many other government agencies, international organizations, research institutions, universities, non-governmental organizations and initiatives provided scientific guidance, contributed data, and reviewed results, including:
Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment (AGRRA)
Coastal Oceans Research and Development in the Indian Ocean (CORDIO)
Conservation International (CI)
Coral Reef Alliance (CORAL)
Healthy Reefs for Healthy People
International Society for Reef Studies (ISRS)
International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN)
L’Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement (IRD)
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)
Oceana
Planetary Coral Reef Foundation
Project AWARE Foundation
Reef Check
Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF)
SeaWeb
Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC)
Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)
U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
University of South Florida (USF)
University of the South Pacific (USP)
Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)
World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

Financial Support:
The Chino Cienega Foundation
The David and Lucile Packard Foundation
The Henry Foundation
International Coral Reef Initiative
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs
The Ocean Foundation
Roy Disney Family Foundation
The Tiffany & Co. Foundation
U.S. Department of the Interior
U.S. Department of State

Global Mangrove Distribution - Global Mangrove Watch 2020-08-28

Land Biodiversity Coastal and Marine biodiversity biopama2 conservation data distribution geo gis global global mangrove watch mangroves

The Global Mangrove Watch (GMW) is a collaboration between Aberystwyth University (U.K.), solo Earth Observation (soloEO; Japan), Wetlands International the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).

The GMW aims to provide geospatial information about mangrove extent and changes to the Ramsar Convention, national wetland practitioners, decision makers and NGOs. It is part of the Ramsar Science and Technical Review Panel (STRP) work plan for 2016-2018 and a Pilot Project to the Ramsar Global Wetlands Observation System (GWOS), which is implemented under the GEO-Wetlands Initiative. The primary objective of the GMW has been to provide countries lacking a national mangrove monitoring system with first cut mangrove extent and change maps, to help safeguard against further mangrove forest loss and degradation.

The GMW has generated a global baseline map of mangroves for 2010 using ALOS PALSAR and Landsat (optical) data, and changes from this baseline for seven epochs between 1996 and 2017 derived from JERS-1, ALOS and ALOS-2. Annual maps are planned from 2018 and onwards.

Citations:
Bunting P., Rosenqvist A., Lucas R., Rebelo L-M., Hilarides L., Thomas N., Hardy A.,
Itoh T., Shimada M. and Finlayson C.M. (2018). The Global Mangrove Watch – a
New 2010 Global Baseline of Mangrove Extent. Remote Sensing 10(10): 1669. doi:
10.3390/rs1010669.
Other cited references:
Thomas N, Lucas R, Bunting P, Hardy A, Rosenqvist A, Simard M. (2017).
Distribution and drivers of global mangrove forest change,

Volcanoes of the World - Global Volcanism Program 2020-08-28

Land Coastal and Marine biopama2 conservation data eruptions geo gis global holocene pleistocene volcanoes

The Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) is housed in the Department of Mineral Sciences, National Museum of Natural History, in Washington D.C. We are devoted to a better understanding of Earth's active volcanoes and their eruptions during the last 10,000 years.

The mission of GVP is to document, understand, and disseminate information about global volcanic activity. We do this through four core functions: reporting, archiving, research, and outreach. The data systems that lie at our core have been in development since 1968 when GVP began documenting the eruptive histories of volcanoes.

Reporting. GVP is unique in its documentation of current and past activity for all volcanoes on the planet active during the last 10,000 years. During the early stages of an eruption anywhere in the world we act as a clearinghouse of reports, data, and imagery. Reports are released in two formats. The Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report provides timely information vetted by GVP staff about current eruptions. The Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network provides comprehensive reporting on recent eruptions on a longer time horizon to allow incorporation of peer-reviewed literature and observatory reports.

Archiving. Complementing our effort toward reporting of current eruptive activity is our database of volcanoes and eruptions that documents the last 10,000 years of Earth's volcanism. These databases and interpretations based on them were published in three editions of the book "Volcanoes of the World".

Research. GVP researchers are curators in the Department of Mineral Sciences and maintain active research programs on volcanic products, processes, and the deep Earth that is the ultimate source of volcanism.

Outreach. This website presents more than 7,000 reports on volcanic activity, provides access to the baseline data and eruptive histories of Holocene volcanoes, and makes available other resources to our international partners, scientists, civil-authorities, and the public.

The Global Volcanism Program relies on an international network of collaborating individuals, programs and organizations, many of which are listed below:

United States Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program (USA). The Volcano Hazards Program monitors active and potentially active volcanoes, assesses their hazards, responds to volcanic crises, and conducts research on volcanoes. The Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) (with the U.S. Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance) works to reduce fatalities and economic losses in countries experiencing a volcano emergency.

Global Volcano Model (Bristol University and the British Geological Survey, UK). GVM is a growing international network that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk.

WOVOdat (Earth Observatory of Singapore). A collective record of volcano monitoring, worldwide - brought to you by the WOVO (World Organization of Volcano Observatories).

Integrated Earth Data Applications (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, USA). A community-based data facility to support, sustain, and advance the geosciences by providing data services for observational solid earth data from the Ocean, Earth, and Polar Sciences.

VHub (The State University of New York at Buffalo, USA). An online resource for collaboration in volcanology research and risk mitigation.

International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI). IAVCEI represents the primary international focus for: (1) research in volcanology, (2) efforts to mitigate volcanic disasters, and (3) research into closely related disciplines, such as igneous geochemistry and petrology, geochronology, volcanogenic mineral deposits, and the physics of the generation and ascent of magmas in the upper mantle and crust. IAVCEI has charged GVP with providing the official names and unique identifier numbers for the world's volcanoes.

National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has established nine Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers tasked with monitoring Volcanic Ash plumes within their assigned airspace.

Global Distribution of Seamounts and Knolls 2020-08-28

Coastal and Marine benthic biopama2 conservation data geo gis knolls marine seamounts

This dataset shows the global distribution of seamounts and knolls identified using global bathymetric data at 30 arc-sec resolution. A total of 33,452 seamounts and 138,412 knolls were identified, representing the largest global set of identified seamounts and knolls to date. Seamount habitat was found to constitute approximately 4.7% of the ocean floor, whilst knolls covered 16.3%.

The research leading to these results received funding from the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme, and from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

Please use the following citation for this dataset:
Yesson C, Clark MR, Taylor M, Rogers AD (2011). The global distribution of seamounts based on 30-second bathymetry data. Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers 58: 442-453. doi: 10.1016/j.dsr.2011.02.004. Data URL:
http://data.unep-wcmc.org/datasets/41

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Dr. Chris Yesson, Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Global Seafloor Geomorphic Features - Blue Habitats 2020-08-28

Coastal and Marine abyss basin benthic biopama2 bridge canyon conservation data escarpment fan geo geomorphic gis guyot hadal marine plateau ridge rift valley rise seafloor seamount shelf sill slope spreading ridge terrace trench trough

Conservation International, GRID-Arendal and Geoscience Australia recently collaborated to produce a map of the global distribution of seafloor geomorphic features. The global seafloor geomorphic features map represents an important contribution towards the understanding of the distribution of blue habitats. Certain geomorphic feature are known to be good surrogates for biodiversity. For example, seamounts support a different suite of species to abyssal plains. A detailed description and analysis of the global geomorphic features map can be found in in the scientific paper published in Marine Geology (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.margeo.2014.01.011). The map and the underlying spatial data can be accessed from http://www.bluehabitats.org/

Seafloor Geomorphic Features Map by Harris, P.T., Macmillan-Lawler, M., Rupp, J. and Baker, E.K. 2014. Geomorphology of the oceans. Marine Geology, 352: 4-24. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The data is available as ESRI shapefiles in a single zipped archive and contains shapefiles for the following geomorphic features: abysses, basins, bridges, canyons, escarpments, fans, glacial troughs, guyots, hadals, plateaus, ridges, rift valleys, rises, seamounts, shelfs, sills, slopes, spreading ridges, terraces, trenches, and troughs.

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Miles Macmillan-Lawler Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

Bio-ORACLE 2.1 - Marine data layers for ecological modelling 2020-08-27

Coastal and Marine biopama2 calcite chlorophyll conservation current data dissolved oxygen geo gis gis data iron marine nitrate opendata oxygen par ph phosphate phytoplankton salinity sea surface silicate temperature

Bio-ORACLE is a set of GIS rasters providing geophysical, biotic and environmental data for surface and benthic marine realms. The data are available for global-scale applications at a spatial resolution of 5 arcmin (approximately 9.2 km at the equator).

Linking biodiversity occurrence data to the physical and biotic environment provides a framework to formulate hypotheses about the ecological processes governing spatial and temporal patterns in biodiversity, which can be useful for marine ecosystem management and conservation.

Bio-ORACLE offers a user-friendly solution to accomplish this task by providing 18 global geophysical, biotic and climate layers at a common spatial resolution (5 arcmin) and a uniform landmask.

The data available in Bio-ORACLE are documented in two peer reviewed articles that you should cite:
Tyberghein L, Verbruggen H, Pauly K, Troupin C, Mineur F, De Clerck O (2012) Bio-ORACLE: A global environmental dataset for marine species distribution modelling. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 21, 272–281.
Assis, J., Tyberghein, L., Bosh, S., Verbruggen, H., Serrão, E. A., & De Clerck, O. (2017). Bio-ORACLE v2.0: Extending marine data layers for bioclimatic modelling. Global Ecology and Biogeography.

Gridded Population of the World, v.4 2020-08-25

Land Built Environment biopama2 conservation data density geo gis global population world population

The Gridded Population of the World, Version 4 (GPWv4): Population Density, Revision 11 consists of estimates of human population density (number of persons per square kilometer) based on counts consistent with national censuses and population registers, for the years 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015, and 2020. A proportional allocation gridding algorithm, utilizing approximately 13.5 million national and sub-national administrative units, was used to assign population counts to 30 arc-second grid cells. The population density rasters were created by dividing the population count raster for a given target year by the land area raster. The data files were produced as global rasters at 30 arc-second (~1 km at the equator) resolution.

Purpose:
To provide estimates of population density for the years 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015, and 2020, based on counts consistent with national censuses and population registers, as raster data to facilitate data integration.

Recommended Citation(s)*:
Center for International Earth Science Information Network - CIESIN - Columbia University. 2018. Gridded Population of the World, Version 4 (GPWv4): Population Density, Revision 11. Palisades, NY: NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC).
https://doi.org/10.7927/H49C6VHW. Accessed DAY MONTH YEAR.

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

International Seabed Authority Annual Report 2020 2020-08-25

Coastal and Marine deep seabed mining international seabed authority isa seabed mining

Minerals are non-renewable resources (at least within human timeframes) but mining them is now apparently a sustainable enterprise, not a one-way street of exploitation. ISA provides an international and transparent forum to regulate and manage all mineral resources related activities and ensure protection of the marine environment in the “Area”, the deep seabed and subsoil beyond national jurisdiction, for the benefit of all humanity.

"Achieving the sustainable use of deep sea minerals for the benefit of humankind" - this annual report was produced by the International Seabed Authority (ISA), linking deep sea mining to sustainable development goals.

Allen Coral Atlas 2020-07-14

Coastal and Marine atlas coral gis reef seagrass

The Allen Coral Atlas combines high resolution satellite imagery, machine learning and field data to produce globally consistent benthic and geomorphic maps of the world's coral reefs. The Atlas is funded primarily by Vulcan Inc. (founded by the late Paul G. Allen); partners include Planet Labs Inc., Arizona State University’s Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science, the National Geographic Society, and the University of Queensland’s Remote Sensing Research Center (UQ-RSRC).

Recommendation for Citing: Allen Coral Atlas (2020). Imagery, maps and monitoring of the world's tropical coral reefs. Zendodo. DOI: doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3833242

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

OpenStreetMap Data Pacific 2020-06-09

gis map open source osm pacific spatial

OpenStreetMap (OSM) is a free, editable map & spatial database of the whole world.
This dataset is an extract of OpenStreetMap data for 21 Pacific Island Countries, in a GIS-friendly format.
The OSM data has been split into separate layers based on themes (buildings, roads, points of interest, etc), and it comes bundled with a QGIS project and styles, to help you get started with using the data in your maps.

This OSM product will be updated weekly and contains data for Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, French Polynesia, Wallis and Futuna, Tokelau, American Samoa as well as data on the Pacific region.

The goal is to increase awareness among Pacific GIS users of the richness of OpenStreetMap data in Pacific countries, as well as the gaps, so that they can take advantage of this free resource, become interested in contributing to OSM, and perhaps join the global OSM community.

Global Reef Expedition - Pacific Ocean 2020-06-08

Coastal and Marine cook islands coral fiji french polynesia maps new caledonia palau reef solomon islands tonga

The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation completed field research for one of the largest coral reef studies in history: the Global Reef Expedition. The Expedition travelled around the globe surveying some of the most remote reefs on the planet, conducting research to assess coral reef ecosystem health and resiliency.

The Global Reef Expedition visited many countries in the Pacific Ocean to assess the health and resiliency of their coral reef ecosystems. See links below for more information, reports and maps.

World Database on Protected Areas 2020-06-07

Land Biodiversity Coastal and Marine biodiversity biopama2 conservation data geo gis marine pacific protected areas terrestrial wdpa

The World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) is the most comprehensive global database of marine and terrestrial protected areas, updated on a monthly basis, and is one of the key global biodiversity data sets being widely used by scientists, businesses, governments, International secretariats and others to inform planning, policy decisions and management.

The WDPA is a joint project between UN Environment and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The compilation and management of the WDPA is carried out by UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC), in collaboration with governments, non-governmental organisations, academia and industry. There are monthly updates of the data which are made available online through the Protected Planet website where the data is both viewable and downloadable.

Data and information on the world's protected areas compiled in the WDPA are used for reporting to the Convention on Biological Diversity on progress towards reaching the Aichi Biodiversity Targets (particularly Target 11), to the UN to track progress towards the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, to some of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) core indicators, and other international assessments and reports including the Global Biodiversity Outlook, as well as for the publication of the United Nations List of Protected Areas. Every two years, UNEP-WCMC releases the Protected Planet Report on the status of the world's protected areas and recommendations on how to meet international goals and targets.

Many platforms are incorporating the WDPA to provide integrated information to diverse users, including businesses and governments, in a range of sectors including mining, oil and gas, and finance. For example, the WDPA is included in the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool, an innovative decision support tool that gives users easy access to up-to-date information that allows them to identify biodiversity risks and opportunities within a project boundary.

The reach of the WDPA is further enhanced in services developed by other parties, such as the Global Forest Watch and the Digital Observatory for Protected Areas, which provide decision makers with access to monitoring and alert systems that allow whole landscapes to be managed better. Together, these applications of the WDPA demonstrate the growing value and significance of the Protected Planet initiative.

CSIRO Bioregions of the South West Pacific Ocean 2020-04-29

Coastal and Marine bioregion csiro

This project has developed sub-regional bioregionalisations for the western-south Pacific Ocean, through expert workshops and novel statistical analysis of physical and biological data. This combines approaches CSIRO developed in Australia, used in the Bay of Bengal (in collaboration with BOBLME) with similar approaches that have been used throughout the Indian and Pacific Oceans to derive a single combined bioregionalisation.

This work was carried out as part of the Global Ocean Biodiversity Initiative (GOBI), which is supported by the International Climate Initiative (IKI). The German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation Nuclear Safety (BMU) supports this initiative on the basis of a decision adopted by the German Bundestag.

MGCP Topographic Dataset 2019-12-05

basemap geo gis spatial topo

The Multi-national Geospatial Co-production Program (MGCP) is a coalition of over 30 countries dedicated to producing high-resolution topographic vector data throughout high interest areas of the world. Data is extracted from high resolution imagery in 1° x 1° cells at a scale of 1:50 000. All data produced must meet a minimum horizontal circular error accuracy of 25m and meet MGCP Technical Reference Documentation (TRD) specifications, which details extraction guidelines and feature catalogues to ensure consistency. Cell and subregion metadata delivered in XML files based on ISO standards 19115 for geographic content and 19139 for XML implementation is available for the data.

Data: boundaries and markers, hydrography (rivers, lakes, waterfalls,…), industry, physiography (soil surface, volcano areas,…), place names, population (buildings,…), transportation (roads, runways,…), utilities, vegetation.

Coastal proximity of populations in 22 Pacific Island Countries and Territories 2019-10-21

Land Coastal and Marine coastal population

A recently published paper, titled “Coastal proximity of populations in 22 Pacific Island Countries and Territories” details the methodology used to undertake the analysis and presents the findings.

Purpose

  • This analysis aims to estimate populations settled in coastal areas in 22 Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTS) using the data currently available. In addition to the coastal population estimates, the study compares the results obtained from the use of national population datasets (census) with those derived from the use of global population grids.

  • Accuracy and reliability from national and global datasets derived results have been evaluated to identify the most suitable options to estimate size and location of coastal populations in the region.

A collaborative project between the Pacific Community (SPC), WorldFish and the University of Wollongong has produced the first detailed population estimates of people living close to the coast in the 22 Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs).

Mapping Mining to SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals) 2019-09-11

Land mining sdg sustainable development goals

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent the world’s plan of action for social inclusion, environmental sustainability and economic development. The mining industry has an unprecedented opportunity to mobilize significant human, physical, technological and financial resources to advance the SDGs.

Mining is a global industry and is often located in remote, ecologically sensitive and less-developed areas that include many indigenous lands and territories. When managed appropriately, it can create jobs, spur innovation and bring investment and infrastructure at a game-changing scale over long time horizons. Yet, if managed poorly, mining can also lead to environmental degradation, displaced populations, inequality and increased conflict, among other challenges.

By mapping the linkages between mining and the SDGs, the aim of this Atlas is to encourage mining companies of all sizes to incorporate relevant SDGs into their business and operations, validate their current efforts and spark new ideas.

GEOSS Portal 2019-08-30

geo map maps satellite spatial

The GEOSS Portal is an online map-based user interface which allows users to discover and access Earth observation data and resources from different providers from all over the world.
The portal is implemented and operated by the European Space Agency and provides a single internet discovery and access point to the ever-growing quantities of heterogeneous collections of Earth observations from satellites, airplanes, drones and in-situ sensors at global, regional and local scales through the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS).
The GEOSS is a social and software ecosystem connecting a large array of observing systems, data systems and processing services to strengthen monitoring of the state of the Earth. It facilitates data and information accessibility and interoperability to support the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) agenda and the Disaster Risk Reduction.

PacificMap 2019-08-30

map maps spatial

The PacificMap is a platform developed by CSIRO Data61 and the Pacific Data Hub (PDH) in collaboration with the Pacific Community Secretariat (SPC), as part of the Asia - Pacific for Development Initiative (D4D). The PacificMap is a platform for map-based access to spatial data from 22 Pacific Island Countries and Territories. It will lower the barrier and enhance access to timely, relevant and useful data for government and non-government organisations, businesses and communities throughout the Pacific.

The PacificMap...
* provides easy access to authoritative and other spatial data to government, business and the public
* facilitates the opening of data by federal, state and local government bodies
* provides an open framework of geospatial data services that supports commercial and community innovation
* allows to create and share interactgive stories directly from your map

To see what data is available on the Pacific Map, refer to the Data Catalogue in the Pacific Map itself. Click the Add data button and expand a category to browse.

UN Biodiversity Lab 2019-08-30

Atmosphere and Climate Land Biodiversity Coastal and Marine biodiversity carbon climate ecosystem services human impact land cover map maps marine natural hazards protected areas restoration socio-economic spatial

The UN Biodiversity Lab is an online platform that allows policymakers and other partners to access global data layers, upload and manipulate their own datasets, and query multiple datasets to provide key information on the Aichi Biodiversity Targets and nature-based Sustainable Development Goals.

The core mission of the UN Biodiversity Lab is three-fold: to build spatial literacy to enable better decisions, to use spatial data as a vehicle for improved transparency and accountability, and to apply insights from spatial data across sectors to deliver on the Convention on Biological Diversity and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Mapping Ocean Wealth Explorer 2019-08-30

Biodiversity Coastal and Marine blue carbon coastal protection coral reef fisheries mangrove map maps recreation spatial tourism

The Mapping Ocean Wealth data viewer is a live online resource for sharing understanding of the value of marine and coastal ecosystems to people. It includes global maps, regionally-specific studies, reference data, and a number of “apps” providing key data analytics. Maps and apps can be opened according to key themes or geographies. The navigator the left of the maps enables you to add or remove any additional map layers as you explore. Information keys explain how the maps were made and provide additional links. Further information and resources can be found on Oceanwealth.org

  • Recreation and Tourism App - Explore the value of healthy ecosystems to the tourism industry
  • Natural Coastal Protection App - Discover the coastal protection benefits of coral reefs around the world
  • Blue Carbon App - View Mangrove Carbon Storage
  • Coral Reef Fisheries App - Learn about the status of coral reef fisheries
  • Regional Planning
  • Mangrove Restoration

Pacific Catastrophe Risk Assessment and Financing Initiative (PCRAFI) 2019-08-30

aerial bathymetry exposure hazard imagery landuse loss map satellite soil spatial topography

The Pacific Catastrophe Risk Assessment and Financing Initiative (PCRAFI) aims to provide the Pacific Island Countries (PICs) with disaster risk modeling and assessment tools. It also aims to engage in a dialogue with the PICs on integrated financial solutions for the reduction of their financial vulnerability to natural disasters and to climate change. The initiative is part of the broader agenda on disaster risk management and climate change adaptation in the Pacific region. Additionally, the Pacific Disaster Risk Assessment Project provides 15 countries with disaster risk assessment tools to help them better understand, model, and assess their exposure to natural disasters.

Framework for Pacific Regionalism 2019-08-28

Atmosphere and Climate Land Biodiversity Built Environment Coastal and Marine Culture and Heritage Inland Waters framework governance inclusive pacific regionalism regionalism

Forum Leaders embrace Pacific regionalism as:

The expression of a common sense of identity and purpose, leading progressively to the sharing of institutions, resources, and markets, with the purpose of complementing national efforts, overcoming common constraints, and enhancing sustainable and inclusive development within Pacific countries and territories and for the Pacific region as a whole

Principal objectives are;

• Sustainable development that combines economic social, and cultural development in ways that improve livelihoods and well-being and use the environment sustainably;
• Economic growth that is inclusive and equitable;
• Strengthened governance, legal, financial, and administrative systems; and
• Security that ensures stable and safe human, environmental and political for all

SPREP core national environment indicators 2019-08-08

Atmosphere and Climate Land Biodiversity Built Environment Coastal and Marine Culture and Heritage Inland Waters environmental indicators mea multilateral environment agreements sdg sustainable development goals

This list of indicators was developed through the Inform project at SPREP for use by Pacific Islands countries (PICs) to meet their national and international reporting obligations. The indicators are typically adopted by PICs for their State of Environment reports and are intended to be re-used for a range of MEA and SDG reporting targets. The indicators have been designed to be measurable and repeatable so that countries can track key aspect of environmental health over time. The indicators are mapped to key MEA and SDG reporting targets and can be used with the Indicator Reporting Tool (also developed by the Inform project) to reduce the burden of environmental reporting on PICs. Indicators can be used as is, adapted for countries needs, or used in conjunction with other national-scale indicators selected by PICs. This dataset includes a summary pdf document and an associated excel file with more detail.

Inform Project Regional Meeting 2019 2019-08-06

Atmosphere and Climate Land Biodiversity Built Environment Coastal and Marine Culture and Heritage Inland Waters capacity building inform project regional meeting

The objective of this regional meeting is to build the capacity of the 14 project target countries, with an aim to build an open data community amongst the users of the national data portals and inform outputs. This is intended to improve south-south collaboration, enhance the opportunity for sustainability and increase the feeling of ownership and belonging amongst the project countries.

This will be delivered by real world application of Inform developed processes and tools, focused on a common area to all countries; protected areas.

The 2019 annual Steering Committee meeting will also be convened.

Venue : Sheraton Aggie Greys Hotel & Bungalows, Apia - Samoa
Dates : 19th - 22nd August 2019

El Niño and its Relationship to Changing background Conditions in the Tropical Pacific Ocean 2019-05-17

Atmosphere and Climate central pacific climate change models eastern pacific el niño greenhouse ocean pacific ocean

This paper addresses the question of whether the increased occurrence of central Pacific (CP) versus Eastern
Pacific (EP) El Niños is consistent with greenhouse gas forced changes in the background state of the tropical Pacific as inferred from global climate change models.

The analysis uses high‐quality satellite and in situ ocean data combined with wind data from atmospheric reanalyses for the past 31 years (1980–2010).

Regional coastal susceptibility assessment for the Pacific Islands 2019-05-08

Atmosphere and Climate Coastal and Marine climate change coastal assessment paccsap susceptibility

A major objective of this report was to develop a regional assessment of Pacific Island sensitivity to projected
climate change as a component of the Pacific-Australia Climate Change Science and Adaptation Planning
(PACCSAP) program. The PACCSAP Program is intended to help partner countries including Cook Islands, Fiji,
Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa,
Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu and their communities better understand and respond to climate associated impacts.

Marine Protected Area Networks in the Coral Triangle : Development and Lessons 2019-05-01

Coastal and Marine coral triangle corals marine life marine protected areas mpa pacific ocean

The Coral Triangle is a marine area located in the western Pacific Ocean. It includes the waters of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Timor Leste and Solomon Islands.

This book provides a comprehensive summary of the current status of six different MPA networks and their complexities. It analyzes MPA networks through their various stages of development including planning and design, implementation and evaluation as they are emerging within and around the Coral Triangle.

Supplementary Livelihood Options for Pacific Island Communities: A Review of Experiences 2019-05-01

Built Environment livelihood sl slopic supplementary livelihood

This report presents results from the Supplementary Livelihoods Options for Pacific Island Communities (SLOPIC) study, carried out by the Foundation of the Peoples of the South Pacific International (FSPI) using New Zealand Aid (NZAid) core funds.

The main aim of this study was to review supplementary livelihood (SL) projects that have taken place across the South Pacific over the past 5 to 10 years, with a view to extracting ‘lessons learned’ and identifying the determinants of success. he single most significant finding that emerged from the review process was the lack of documentation of SL efforts.

Guidance Document on Improving National Reporting by Parties to the Basel Convention 2019-05-01

Land Built Environment Coastal and Marine basel convention guidance hazardous waste national reporting reporting waste

The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous and their Disposal (the Basel Convention) is the broadest and most significant international treaty on hazardous and other wastes.

This guidance document is primarily meant to be a practical guide for the national technical officials responsible for the collection of information for the preparation of the national reports that are to be submitted annually to the Secretariat of the Basel Convention.

MEA Negotiator's Handbook 2019-05-01

Atmosphere and Climate Land Biodiversity Built Environment Coastal and Marine Culture and Heritage Inland Waters handbook mea multilateral environmental agreements negotiations negotiator

The number of multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) and institutions has grown steadily over the last few decades. The work taking place under these agreements and within these institutions is increasing in volume and specificity, and it is having an increasingly substantive impact, particularly as there is an increasing focus on practical implementation.

This edition of the Multilateral Environmental Agreement Negotiator’s Handbook principally to respond to the need for a practical reference tool to assist in addressing the many complex challenges in such negotiations.

Disaster response and climate change in the Pacific 2019-04-29

Atmosphere and Climate adaptive capacity climate change cook islands disaster disaster response fiji resilience samoa vanuatu

Disasters, and therefore disaster response, in the Pacific are expected to be affected by climate change. This research addressed this issue, and focused on the immediate humanitarian needs following a disaster, drawing upon adaptive capacity as a concept to assess the resilience of individual organisations and the robustness of the broader system of disaster response..

Four case study countries (Fiji, Cook Islands, Vanuatu and Samoa) were chosen for deeper investigation of the range of issues present in the Pacific.

Pacific experiences with modalities relevant for Climate Change Financing 2019-04-29

Atmosphere and Climate climate change climate change finance climate financing climate funds finances forum secretariat modalities

The Forum Secretariat in collaboration with a number of Member countries, Council of Regional Organisations in the Pacific (CROP) and development partners is exploring a range of modalities, approaches and enabling environments that might assist countries to more effectively harness climate change resources and implement them to address national priorities. A number of these modalities are already being implemented or explored in the region and provide a practical experience to draw from -

This booklet therefore presents a compilation of some of these practical experiences and has been contributed to by a number of countries and partners in the region.

State of Conservation Reports - Territories 2019-04-26

Biodiversity Coastal and Marine Inland Waters conservation french polynesia guam indicators northern mariana islands pitcairn islands regional regional soe soe state of conservation reports tokelau wallis and futuna

For the Ninth Pacific Islands Conference on Nature Conservation and Protected Areas December 2013, the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) commissioned an assessment of the status of biodiversity and conservation in Oceania.

This dataset holds all the reports that assesses the overall state of conservation in;

  • Guam

  • French Polynesia

  • Northern Mariana Islands

  • Tokelau

  • Wallis and Futuna

  • Pitcairn Islands

These reports weren't published but were sent to country for checking (2013) - to be used for the Regional SOE initiative 2019

Aichi Biodiversity Targets - Quick Guide 2019-04-17

Biodiversity aichi biodiversity targets biodiversity targets

This document contains a set of quick guides on each of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets. The guides provide an overview of the main issues addressed under each target. They aim to provide Parties and other stakeholders with an introduction to each of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets by quickly introducing key terms, highlighting some of the implications for national target setting, providing guiding questions for consideration as part of national target setting exercises, providing ideas for preliminary national actions, identifying possible indicators to monitor progress and identifying further resources.

Practical guide to solid waste management in Pacific Island Countries & Territories 2019-04-05

Land jprism landfill improvement solid waste waste generation waste management

This Practical Guide is the compilation of good practices identified and developed by experts in the region through J-PRISM Phase I. This covers all solid waste management (SWM) issues from the technical ones, such as waste generation survey and landfill improvement, to the managerial ones, such as contract management and user pays system. These good practices have high applicability to other Pacific islands, although modification and adaptation are always necessary.

Effects of Climate Change on Extreme Events 2019-03-07

Atmosphere and Climate climate change extreme events pacific cmss

Pacific Island Commonwealth Member States (Pacific CMSs) are highly vulnerable to climate change (high confidence; robust evidence, high agreement). Impacts of climate change on extreme events relevant to Pacific CMSs vary, dependent on the magnitude, frequency, and temporal and spatial extent of the event, as well as on the biophysical nature of the island and its social, economic, and political setting (high confidence). This paper assesses the impacts of climate change on extreme events on nine Pacific CMSs – Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

Effects of Climate Change on Fish and Shellfish 2019-03-07

Atmosphere and Climate Coastal and Marine climate change effects coastal fisheries fisheries marine invetebrates marine vetebrates shellfish

In the Pacific Islands region, fish and invertebrates (specifically shellfish) fulfill important ecological roles in coastal and oceanic habitats, and many species are targeted by fisheries, making vital contributions to food security, livelihoods, government revenue and cultural heritage. This report discusses how climate change is expected to have profound effects on the status and distribution of coastal and oceanic habitats, the fish and invertebrates they support and, as a result, the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture

Effects of Climate Change on 1.5° Temperature Rise 2019-03-06

Atmosphere and Climate 1.5° climate change temperature rise vulnerability

This report synthesizes the emerging evidence of climate impacts at different temperature thresholds for Pacific islands. All evidence points to vast differences in impacts in a 1.5˚C world, compared to the +3˚C world to which our current policies and climate change pledges are leading us. For Pacific islands and marine and coastal ecosystems in the region, these differences cannot be overstated; even a 0.5˚C difference (between 1.5˚C and 2˚C) may mean that critical tipping points are crossed.

Large Marine Ecosystems Status and Trends - Summary for Policy Makers 2019-02-27

Coastal and Marine Inland Waters ecosystem trans-boundary water system twap

The water systems of the world — aquifers, lakes, rivers, large marine ecosystems, and open ocean — sustain the
biosphere and underpin the health and socioeconomic well-being of the world’s population. Many of these systems are shared by two or more nations. Recognizing the value of trans-boundary water systems, and the reality that many of them continue to be over-exploited and degraded, and managed in fragmented ways, the Global Environment Facility (GEF) initiated the Trans-boundary Waters Assessment Programme (TWAP). The Programme aims to provide a baseline assessment to identify and evaluate changes in these water systems caused by human activities and natural processes, as well as the consequences these changes may have on the human populations dependent upon them.

Monitoring and Management of the humphead wrasse 2019-02-26

Coastal and Marine destructive fishing fisheries management humphead wrasse marine resources overfishing

The humphead wrasse Cheilinus undulatus is a small but important part of the international trade in live reef food fish, being one of the highest species in unit value. The main threats of the live reef food fish trade to the sustainability of the species are overfishing and the effects of destructive fishing on the target species, non-target species and on the reef environment. In this context this report discusses the core elements of a management system for humphead wrasse, making considerations about major fisheries management objectives, management measures, enforcement, monitoring and fisheries assessment.

Biology and Impacts of Pacific Island Invasive Species - Golden Crownbeard 2019-02-26

Biodiversity golden crownbeard herbaceous plants invasive plants verbesina encelioides

Verbesina encelioides, a gray, golden crownbeard, is a sunflower-like herbaceous annual plant ranging in height from 0.3 to 1.7 m with showy yellow flowers. It is native to the southwestern United States, the Mexican Plateau, and other parts of tropical America. Its invasive characteristics include high seed production (as many as 300–350 seeds per flower and multiple flowers per plant), seed dormancy, ability to tolerate dry conditions, and possible allelopathic effects. Many other Pacific islands with similar habitats could be invaded by V. encelioides

This research stresses out that Verbesina encelioides can be controlled via herbicides or mechanical means, but measures must be repeated due to the presence of persistent seed banks. Further research on V. encelioides is needed to understand its population dynamics, allelopathic properties, and impacts on natural ecosystems.

Invasive Species Management in the Pacific: A Review of National Plans 2010 2019-02-26

Biodiversity invasive species nbsap

This review was undertaken to examine the invasive species management components within the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plans of twelve Pacific island countries (PICs): Cook Islands, Fiji, Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu.

The results of the review show that invasive species management is included as a component in eleven National
Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plans, Marshall Islands being the only country not to include invasive species
management at the time.

Marine Opportunity Costs: A method for calculating opportunity costs to multiple stakeholder groups 2019-02-26

Coastal and Marine marine marine opportunity costs opportunity costs

This study seek to address the following 5 main questions:

(1) Where are the preferred target species located and what spatial models serve as the best predictors of species abundance;
(2) Where in Kubulau is current fishing effort focused and how does it vary by gear;
(3) What are the differences in opportunity costs across users of different fishing gear, based on current and potential costs;
(4) Where would be the best areas to modify the current MPA network to reduce conflict and improve fisheries benefits and which users would be most affected by these changes; and
(5) How can this model be applied to other resource management decisions?

Strategic Plan for the Conservation and Management of Marine Resources in the Pacific region 2019-02-26

Coastal and Marine fisheries marine management marine resources marine resources strategic plan noaa pacific islands region strategic plan

This Strategic Plan provides an integrated overview of a science based to living marine resource conservation and management in the Pacific Islands Region. The goals and objectives reflect here also generally reflect NOAA Fisheries national goals with appropriate acknowledgements of the unique cultural, historical, geographical and ecological features that characterize the people and living marine resources of the region

Lime Juice and Vinegar Injections as an Alternative to Control COTS Outbreaks 2019-02-26

Coastal and Marine acidic injection coastal communities coral reef ecosystem corallivorous crown of thorns cots crown of thorns marine resources natural alternatives reef vanuatu

Outbreaks of the corallivorous crown-of-thorns seastar Acanthaster planci (COTS) represent one of the greatest disturbances to coral reef ecosystems in the Indo-Pacific, affecting not only coral reefs but also the coastal communities which rely on their resources. This research paper documents a test of a new alternative control method based upon acidic injections of cheap, 100% natural products that was carried out in Vanuatu where the presence of COTS has frequently been reported.

The paper concluded that the injections of lime juice and vinegar offer great advantages when compared to current best practices and constitute a cheap and natural option for all reefs affected by COTS

Human Rights and Climate Change Law 2019-02-19

Atmosphere and Climate climate change climate change law cop cop21 human rights human rights law international law international legal framework journal of the south pacific law kyoto protocol law unfccc

This Special Issue of the Journal of South Pacific Law aims to provide insight into the role of international law in addressing the short-term and long-term challenges posed by climate change to Pacific Island States and their populations. It focuses on the two international legal frameworks that were designed to protect the Earth’s climate system and the human person: international climate change law on the one hand, and international human rights law on the other.

Pacific Islands Ocean Acidification Vulnerability Assessment 2019-02-19

Coastal and Marine acidification aquaculture climate change fisheries food security livelihood ocean ocean acidification ocean chemistry oceanic habitats pacific ocean ph vulnerability assessment

This report summarises the projected changes in ocean chemistry for the Pacific island region (from 130°E to 130°W and 25°N to 25°S) at regional and sub-regional scales, assessing the vulnerability of Pacific coastal and oceanic habitats and fisheries to ocean acidification using an established framework, and discussing the implications for the Pacific island communities dependent on fisheries and aquaculture for food security and livelihood

EIA Guidelines for Coastal Tourism Development in Pacific Island Countries and Territories 2019-02-19

Built Environment coastal tourism development eia emp environment environmental impact assessment green growth targets guideline impact assessment pacific region tourism

Environmental impact assessment (EIA) is a tool that is used to assess and manage individual development projects, with an aim of maximising positive benefits and minimising negative impacts for local communities and their environment. When used effectively, EIA can help to support the achievement of green growth targets, climate change resilience, and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

This EIA is for the purpose of guiding tourism operations towards responsible planning, development and management of coastal tourism, to help ensure that the sector does not degrade important coastal areas, and that it makes a positive overall contribution to Pacific island countries and territories.

Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation, Mitigation and Indigenous People 2019-02-18

Atmosphere and Climate adaptation climate change environmental change indigenous communities indigenous people mitigation resilience

This compendium presents a wide-ranging overview of more than 400 projects, case studies and research activities specifically related to climate change and Indigenous Peoples. It provides a sketch of the climate and environmental changes, local observations and impacts being felt by communities in different regions, and outlines various adaptation and mitigation strategies that are currently being implemented by Indigenous Peoples

Pacific Islands Regional Marine Species 2019-02-08

Coastal and Marine dolphin dugong eez marine species migratory species pacific ocean turtle whale

The Marine Species Programme of the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) outlines a regional strategy for the cooperative conservation and management of dugongs, marine turtles, whales and dolphins. This strategy will enable Pacific Islanders to take a primary role in achieving the following vision:

"A healthy Pacific Ocean with sustainable populations of whales, dolphins, marine turtles, dugongs and other species, and meets the aspirations of Pacific Island peoples and protects their natural and cultural heritage"

State of the Environment Toolkit 2019-01-25

Atmosphere and Climate Land Biodiversity Built Environment Coastal and Marine Culture and Heritage Inland Waters guideline soe soe guide soe help soe indicators soe template soe toolkit state of the environment toolkit toolkit

State of Environment (SoE) reports provide in-country partners with a process to gather data on current environmental indicators, document their status, and formulate a plan for keeping these indicators on track or developing policies and programs as needed. This SoE Toolkit dataset contains resources that serve as guides to help create up-to-date State of Environment reports.

State of Conservation in Oceania - Regional Report 2018-12-13

Biodiversity biodiversity climate change conservation ecosystem environmental governance habitats indicators oceania over-exploitation species

This report assesses the overall state of conservation in the Pacific Islands region of Oceania, that is, the 21 countries and territories covered by SPREP plus Pitcairn Island. The report uses an analysis of 16 indicators chosen in consultation with SPREP and based on the Global Biodiversity Indicator project (http://www.bipindicators.net). The indicators used are those considered to best provide an overview of the key issues facing conservation in Oceania, whilst recognizing the need to use indicators for which a reasonable amount of information was thought to be available. The indicators provide information about the state of ecosystems and species, pressures acting upon these ecosystems and species, and what action is being taken to halt further loss or degradation and improve long-term sustainability.

Publisher: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Contact Point: Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme Source: Tuvalu Environment Data Portal

InforMEA - United Nations Information Portal on Multilateral Environmental Agreements 2018-11-27

Atmosphere and Climate Land Biodiversity Coastal and Marine agreements informea multilateral environment agreements online course pull treaties

InforMEA provides easy access to information on Multilateral Environmental Agreements. It is an initiative facilitated by the United Nations Environment Programme and supported by the European Union. It seeks to develop Inter-operable information systems for the benefit of the (MEA) Parties and the environment community at large.
This dataset provides direct links to:
1. "Pacific Islands" - related data on the InforMEA portal. For country-specific information, please type name of country on the InforMEA portal search tool.
2. Free online courses

InterRidge Vents Database 2018-11-21

Coastal and Marine active vent hydrothermal interridge global submarine vent vent

Direct internet link to the InterRidge Global Database of active submarine hydro-thermal vent fields. The database includes a vocabulary of vent field names and information that may be useful in mapping, including position (latitude, longitude), depth, region, tectonic setting category, national jurisdiction, and ocean. Additional information in the database includes names of individual vent sites within vent fields, spreading rate for those vent fields at spreading centers, maximum temperature or temperature category (high or low) for active vent fields, and notes on site description, deposit type, host rock, and biology for some of the vent fields.

NOAA Coral Reef Watch 2018-11-19

Coastal and Marine bleaching coral coral bleaching model noaa outlook reef satellite

The NOAA Coral Reef Watch program uses satellite data to provide current reef environmental conditions to quickly identify areas at risk for coral bleaching. Bleaching is the process by which corals lose the symbiotic algae that give them their distinctive colors. If a coral is severely bleached, disease and death become likely. Coral Reef Watch also offers a modeled Outlook that predicts the likelihood of coral bleaching heat stress on a week-by-week basis, up to four months in the future (the typical length of a bleaching season).

ByCatch Information 2018-06-11

Coastal and Marine billfish bycatch database fmro spc

The Bycatch Management Information System (BMIS) focuses on bycatch mitigation and management in oceanic tuna and billfish fisheries*. It is an open resource useful for fishery managers, fishers, scientists, observers, educators and anyone with an interest in fisheries management. As a reference and educational tool, the BMIS aims to support the adoption and implementation of science-based management measures so that bycatch is managed comprehensively and sustainably. The BMIS mainly focuses on highly migratory species with low reproductive rates, including seabirds, sharks and rays, sea turtles and marine mammals.

Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies (APPS) Working Paper Series 04/2013 October 2013 2018-05-30

Built Environment Culture and Heritage 2013 asia assessment club theory pacific pacific island countries policy studies political economy regionalism sids small island developing states

This research is part of the Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies (APPS) Working Paper Series 04/ published October 2013. The Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies is a peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary journal that targets research in policy studies in Asia and the Pacific. The Journal aims to break down barriers across disciplines and generate policy impact. Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies has funding support from the aid agency of the Australian Government’s development assistance agency, AusAID, and commissions research in areas of particular interest to the Journal's editors and AusAID.

78 Development Bulletin 2018-05-30

Built Environment Culture and Heritage 2017 cities development development bulletin governance land access pacific pacific way policy politics settlements urban urban services urbinisation

The Development Bulletin has, for 28 years, been the journal of the Development Studies Network based at the Australian National University. It is an occasional publication providing at least one issue a year. The journal includes commissioned and submitted papers and is available in hard copy or online for free download. Each issue focuses on a specific, topical development theme providing a multi-disciplinary perspective on a range of opinions on development activities, theories, and research. The papers in DB are short and concise with a word limit of 3,500. Authors include academics, non academics, development professionals, those working in non government and government organisations, consultants, teachers, community leaders, politicians and students of development. The 78 issues of Development Bulletin are available online. Together, they provide a valuable history of social and economic development, development theory, policy, practice and development studies.

The Wealth of Islands : Global Call for Conservation 2006 2018-05-29

Land Biodiversity 2006 biodiversity loss convention of biological diversity diversity drivers islands livelihoods millenium ecosystems assessment threats wealth

This brochure drew significantly from a technical publication by Deda et al. (submitted for publication to Natural Resources Forum), the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment report on Island Systems by Wong et al. 2005, the report of the Ad Hoc Technical Expert Group on Island Biodiversity, which met in Tenerife in 2004 and the draft programme of work on island biodiversity adopted by the Subsidiary Body for Scientifc, Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA) at its tenth meeting in 2005